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Any experience with moterboard cooling via fans???

Discussion in 'Overclocking & Cooling' started by PY_champ, 11 Dec 2020.

  1. PY_champ

    Associate

    Joined: 11 Dec 2020

    Posts: 6

    Location: Paraguay

    Hello,

    i'm writing here because to my previous request at another site absolutely nobody replied.
    MY request was like that:
    "Hello.
    I'm a new in PC building, so possibly my question is gonna sound stupidly to some experts. Forgive me pleas if this is the case.
    I'm planing to built my very one gaming PC. As i life in a very hot country (more than 40 degree Celsius in the shadow in the Summer and high air humidity) and y share my PC with my brothers (which would mean its running full time under full load at weekends) I'm thinking of a way to get max cooling with a AIO360mm radiator from NZXT while keeping the budget low.
    I'm pretty sure that the radiator would be enough for the CPU but what about the motherboard an the RAM, etc.? i have read on some website that with AIO coolers and water cooling in general you face high motherboard temperatures because of a lack of air movement over it. As the PC should last as long as possible, i want to avoid high temperatures at all.
    So i thought of installing by some self made support two fans on the front side of the motherboard, one above the pump and one over the RAM, and maby one at it's backside in the cable channel witch would blow air to the cpu from the behind.
    Has anyone done or seen something like this befor? And would there be any risks for the motherboard? (maby deformation because of temperature rise and fall and differences over the motherboard?) as i haven't found anything like that in the web, i suppose this thread to purely hypothetical. Very much thanks i advance and please forgive me my bad English. Greetings from Paraguay
    PY_champ"

    Later I replyed myself to my question becaus I have found someting similar in the web:

    "I dont know why nobody replied to my post so far, but in the meantime i have found something in the web that go's into the same direction as my request.
    youtube.com/watch?v=RTR9OSkgA7M
    The guy in the vide installed in a very cheep but effective way a fan over his motherboard and his AIO cooler. It's only one but ist very like what i want to do. is it worth it? are there sideefects? How bad is the air movement in the case influenced by something like this? That's the things i'm asking myself, but as i'm not an expert in pc-building, i put my question in here hoping for at least one answer. Very much thanks in advance"

    So as i'm still wondering about wheter it makes sense, if it's dangerous and so one. Hoping someone here could gimme a wink. Thanks.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: 12 Dec 2020
  2. mickyflinn

    Capodecina

    Joined: 23 Mar 2011

    Posts: 11,091

    Location: West Side

    Moving the heat as quick as possible out of the case is the key , having decent fans with high airflow. If you want less noise then theres a compromise as the fans usually run slower.

    What case will you be getting.
     
  3. PY_champ

    Associate

    Joined: 11 Dec 2020

    Posts: 6

    Location: Paraguay

    probably the cooler master masterbox td500 mesh, not sure yet. i just wanted to install fans that blow onto the motherboard and not just pass it, simply to have air wich takes away heat of the motherboard and the components around thecpu with aio cooler. so, as i alrady mentioned, this is purely hipothetical. i have 40 degrees Celsius where i live and sometimes more. for consequence no common pc will run under 50 degrees at idle. for comparision i have a laptop with coolingpad (4 fans) runing at idle at 60 degrees. i can't take the cpu to more then 65% on log term without reaching terrmaltrotelnig limits (=90 degrees). have you watchd the video? whats your opinion about it?
     
  4. Something Else

    Mobster

    Joined: 19 Feb 2012

    Posts: 4,408

    I don't think you need to worry about it really but an aio like the Arctic liquid freezer range has a small fan for vrm cooling which works.
     
  5. PY_champ

    Associate

    Joined: 11 Dec 2020

    Posts: 6

    Location: Paraguay

    thanks for you replys guys, but my most important question still remains: can i cool a motherboard with fans blowing onto it or do i have to worry about anything? i.g. are there risks/dangers?
     
  6. doyll

    Sgarrista

    Joined: 1 Jul 2011

    Posts: 8,391

    As said, probably not something to worry about. Video talking head has fan mounted in position where most cases have no vent in side covers, so when side cover is mounted fan has no source of cool air.
     
  7. mickyflinn

    Capodecina

    Joined: 23 Mar 2011

    Posts: 11,091

    Location: West Side

  8. PY_champ

    Associate

    Joined: 11 Dec 2020

    Posts: 6

    Location: Paraguay

    perfect. many thanks
     
  9. Tetras

    Mobster

    Joined: 22 Jun 2006

    Posts: 3,744

    My strongest suggestion is that you over-spec the components, especially on the VRM side. The last thing you want is a VRM that is borderline for your CPU, because it will have high temperatures. Buildzoid gives information about the quality of the components and their tolerances in his videos.

    The VRM cooling and RAM heatsinks need to be effective if you want the fans to work, some motherboards have much better heatsinks than others. I don't think you need to worry about the risks of deformation because fans can't cool below ambient and the VRM area is always significantly hotter than the rest of the motherboard. Some cases have the option of installing fans in the side and during the Prescott era it was pretty common.

    There are some motherboards that are designed for hot environments, especially server and industrial boards like Fujitsu (now Kontron) used to produce which operate up to 50C. It might be worth emailing support for e.g. ASUS, Gigabyte and asking if they can recommend specific boards. ASUS commercial/CSM boards are marketed as moisture-resistant, for example.
     
  10. PY_champ

    Associate

    Joined: 11 Dec 2020

    Posts: 6

    Location: Paraguay

    now thats informativ! wasn't aware of that. Thanks a lot, dude.:) And merry christmas to everyone