1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Apple Service Manuals

Discussion in 'Linux & Open Source' started by Mat, 5 May 2006.

  1. Mat

    Capodecina

    Joined: 18 Oct 2002

    Posts: 13,905

    In case anyone ever has the need, there *snip* is a step by step guide to fixing laptops and minis here (we've used this one at work):

    http://www.ifixit.com/Guide/
     
    Last edited: 5 May 2006
  2. FishFluff

    Soldato

    Joined: 7 Nov 2003

    Posts: 5,354

    Location: Deepest, darkest Leeds

    As helpful as they are, you may want to remove those links. The Something Awful forums received a legal threat from Apple this week after someone posted a link to the very same files...
     
  3. M0KUJ1N

    PermaBanned

    Joined: 17 Mar 2004

    Posts: 1,486

    Location: Edinburgh

    Hmm yet another reason why Apple have went down in my estimation severely over the past 6 months :(

    Their hypocritical stance on Bootcamp, their support of DRM and their knee jerk over-reactions to sites like this and the OSXrumours sites mean that they (as a company) are even lower down my list than Microsoft!

    Of course I wouldnt care quite so much if they didnt try and portray a "we're the good guys, MS are th bad guys" corporate persona but until they relax their EULAs and play on a level playing field all the time, not just when it suits them, I cant see me buying another bit of Apple hardware.

    That said, I dont condone potentially breaking the law :)
     
  4. Al Vallario

    Mobster

    Joined: 3 Aug 2005

    Posts: 4,534

    Location: UK

    Hypocritical stance on Bootcamp? They've just released software to let people run Windows (among other operating systems) on their hardware. I don't see anything hypocritical about that, or the way in which they've rolled it out.

    If they didn't DRM the files on the iTunes Music Store record companies wouldn't talk to them, there wouldn't be any content and they wouldn't be one of (if not the?) largest online music stores in the business. It's the content providors (record labels, film studios etc.) who are advocating DRM, and companies like Apple have no choice but to go along with it.

    Knee-jerk reactions? Don't you think it's a good thing that Apple actively monitor all these rumour sites, listen to what the people are saying and act fast to protect the integrity of their company?

    Since when did Apple portray such a corporate persona? Do you have any quotes, articles, or just anything to back such a claim up?

    av. :)
     
    Last edited: 5 May 2006
  5. M0KUJ1N

    PermaBanned

    Joined: 17 Mar 2004

    Posts: 1,486

    Location: Edinburgh

    Sorry in a bit of a ranty mood in general (must be the heat) but I still think the majority of my comments, whilst probably not popular are still correct.

    OK, picture this scenario. I have an Intel Mac (which technically is an Intel PC in a shiny white box these days, but thats not the point). On purchase of it I receive a legal copy of Tiger. I purchase a copy of Windows XP Pro and install it.

    Now, switch the scenario round. I log onto Dell's website and purchase a nice new shiny Latitude notebook. It comes with a legal copy of Windows XP with it. Now I go to the shop and purchase a copy of Tiger. However I am not allowed to install the software which I just spent my hard-earned money on, because Apple want to preserve their hardware cartel. If this isnt a hypocritical sitation on Apples part, can you point me to the page on Roget's thesaurus that gives a better word for it :)

    This may be true, mainly due to the RIAA situation but there are other online music stores (such as eMusic) who sell their music in a common (though still proprietary) format without any DRM. I'll give you this one but I think out of all the hardware vendors at the moment, Apple are the ones most likely to introduce "trusted computing" first.

    So you don't think a huge multinational company threatening to sue ordinary members of the public for discussing what their next greatest product is, is in any way overkill? Can you imagine how many lawsuits MS would have to introduce every time someone hosted pictures of Vista or slagged them off?

    Have you seen any Apple advertising campaign over the last 10 years? The "Switch" campaign is a particularly good example. (http://www.appletvads.com/category/switch-ads/)
    Not to mention the fact that the Apple press (Mac User, Mac Format etc) have spent the last 10 years criticising Microsoft for doing precisely the sort of things Apple are doing now. I'm sure I could dig out a few articles when I get a chance to hunt through my work back-catalogue of these magazines.

    Found one article with a quick search of Google, but a John Dvorak article in PC magazine isnt exactly what we'd call "objective".
    http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,4149,263476,00.asp

    Now I'm not particularly a Microsoft fan-boy. I have used and owned Macs in the past but I think that with the recent change to Intel architecture Apple want to have their cake and eat it at the expense of consumer rights. Even Sun didn't try half the tricks Apple are trying when they moved their low-end kit away from Sparc to intel!
     
  6. Sharknose

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 18 Oct 2002

    Posts: 1,772

    I've been researching about OS X, etc etc because I'm looking to get a MacBookPro sometime, and I've been reading with great interest about the over-heating issues.

    Like M0KUJ1N, my pretty high opinion of Apple has taken a bit of a hit. OK, maybe not so much of a downer on them as M0KUJ1N (though I can fully understand where he is coming from in some of his point).



    Anyway, back onto the topic at hand. I'm suprised at how much thermal paste Apple were putting onto the components. Surely they know that won't work??? Most of the techie people on this forum (this is a site originally for overclocking people) would know this to be the case.
    What's bizarre to me is how Apple seem to reacting to this issue. From what I've read, they don't seem to be acknowledging the issue.

    Mind you, I'm still looking at switching for what it's worth.
     
  7. TCEuk

    Hitman

    Joined: 17 Jul 2004

    Posts: 641

    Location: Surrey

    Exactly the same situation with me, although i was warey of apple before all of this due to ipods which in my opinion have gone downhill since G3. With ipods i think apple can see that people will continue to buy ipods no matter what due to their image, so they feel that they can offer less and charge £20 for extras which would have been free previously.

    I havn't really been reading about mac news till recently, so i'd be interested to know what their service was like in the past, and wether or not this is just a brief phase in apple due to this product which in my opinion shouldn't have been released with these issues.

    Yeah when i saw that picture of the amount of paste they put on with the annotation saying "you should use about one tube per square" i was completely shocked, how could no one have not mentioned this before they were put into production?! Surely it would be well worth the cost for apple, for the sake of its reputation and for financial costs, to republish the repair manual, send a memo or whatever out to all repair staff informing them of the changes and to start making the new ones properly?

    Like i said before, i'd be interested to know if apple have had these sorts of issues with their products (apart from ipods) before.
     
  8. MagicBoy

    Capodecina

    Joined: 18 Oct 2002

    Posts: 16,703

    Location: South Manchester

    It's the difference between hardware and software. Once you've bought a Mac it's yours to do with as you wish. Use it as a PC, use it as a bookend, turn it into a vase or drop it from the 43rd floor of a tower block - it's your decision. Do Apple care? I doubt it.

    Buy OS X and you don't own it - you own a license to use it. There's no hardware or tangible good as the DVD is purely a delivery medium. The intellectual property belongs to Apple therefore they can do pretty much what they want.

    OS X is limited it to Apple hardware out of the box because Apple have control over it. With an Apple controlled hardware platform such as the MacBook Pro they can guarantee the quality of the OS. Open up OS X to any old Intel PC and Apple will have to support all the people with untested hardware combinations. Oh and someone will have to write a multitude of drivers. Remember how long it took MS and all the hardware manufacturers to get the Windows NT/2000/XP line stable with many more resources available?
     
  9. FishFluff

    Soldato

    Joined: 7 Nov 2003

    Posts: 5,354

    Location: Deepest, darkest Leeds

    The first gen of most apple hardware releases usually have a few bugs in them. A lot of people just wait for the Rev. B models which Aple usually sneak out of the door with the minimum of fuss :p

    Don't get me wrong, I like Apple stuff, but I think they're far too pricey due to their image and their legal department needs a complete overhaul.
     
  10. TCEuk

    Hitman

    Joined: 17 Jul 2004

    Posts: 641

    Location: Surrey

    I see. They like to take their time releasing their Rev B model it would seem :( .