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Best software for virtualisation?

Discussion in 'Apple Software' started by teknokid, 1 Nov 2014.

  1. teknokid

    Hitman

    Joined: 16 Feb 2010

    Posts: 516

    I just purchased a 15" rMacbook, which I will be using for a bit of Cad work.

    I was wondering which app people find best for virtualisation and why?

    I'll mainly be using solid works if that makes a difference.

    Thanks,
     
  2. momo56

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 18 Jul 2009

    Posts: 2,198

    I use parallels 10 for Solidworks. Works pretty well. Haven't tried rendering or any of the flow simulations so not sure about the performance difference but other than that it works fine.

    Although if you're a student you can also get VMWare for free.
     
  3. teknokid

    Hitman

    Joined: 16 Feb 2010

    Posts: 516

    That's good to know - I'll probably be doing a bit of flow sim, hopefully that doesn't kill it..

    Where abouts is the free student edition? The only ones I can find are ~£50?

    Cheers
     
  4. momo56

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 18 Jul 2009

    Posts: 2,198

    e5.onthehub.com

    Your uni has to send you a link for registration. Should then see VMware Fusion 7.0 on there.
     
  5. AbsenceJam

    Mobster

    Joined: 2 Nov 2007

    Posts: 4,304

  6. InfiniteNoise

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 3 Feb 2011

    Posts: 1,102

    Parallels offers better 3D performance, VMware Fusion offers better battery life (useful if you're on a MacBook)
     
  7. teknokid

    Hitman

    Joined: 16 Feb 2010

    Posts: 516

    My uni won't offer me VMware as I'm not a IT student :(

    I think I'll go with parallels, for solid works it looks like it's the best option, thank you!
     
  8. MacRS4

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 15 Dec 2008

    Posts: 2,463

    Location: London

    I use both Parallels and VMWare Fusion, but for slightly different things. Desktop stuff I always use Parallels - like it's mentioned above it integrates better with the desktop environment.

    For server based stuff, or anything that scales - I.e. multiple VMs - Fusion is better in my experience. It's also simpler to migrate to ESX should ever need to go that route.
     
  9. InfiniteNoise

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 3 Feb 2011

    Posts: 1,102

    This is the main reason why I prefer VMware, it's also easier to use your VMs between different platforms (since there's no Parallels for Windows)
     
  10. Avalon

    Soldato

    Joined: 29 Dec 2002

    Posts: 6,423

    I'm currently setting up with Fusion for three main reasons.

    1) Performance is not a major issue for me, I need to run some legacy software from the late 90's that would be just as quick on a Celeron 300a.
    2) Fusion is based on a per user licencing model which for a single user with a few mac's is more cost effective to deploy.
    3) Fusion has an easy migration path if I choose/need to change host OS or hardware in the future.

    For your intended use i'd agree Parallels makes more sense, try a demo and see how you get on for a 14 days, but don't rule out Fusion, synthetic benchmarks aren't always the best way to judge what's best.
     
    Last edited: 13 Nov 2014
  11. Avalon

    Soldato

    Joined: 29 Dec 2002

    Posts: 6,423

    I have to retract my comment above, I needed to run a win7 vm to do some design/vinyl cutting (the industry is Corel based) and while VMWare was fine at running Draw/printing, it fell over one one critical point, the USB implementation sucks causing jobs to stop mid cut, when you've got hundreds of glasses to etch that's not fun. Migration was simple after I changed the the HD setting in Fusion to single file and after re-activating Win7 Parallels worked without issue, i'll see the demo out before I buy but it's looking like it works better for my intended use.
     
    Last edited: 13 Nov 2014