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Chill Factor / Xscape

Discussion in 'Sports Arena' started by physichull, 30 May 2010.

  1. physichull

    Sgarrista

    Joined: 22 Sep 2008

    Posts: 9,530

    Location: Warrington

    Has anybody been to these indoor ski arenas before?

    If so, how do they compare to the real thing? I went for a taster session today at the Chillfactor in Manchester and have never skii'd before in my life. I thoroughly enjoyed it, even if it was all a bit basic (and rightfully so considering I didn't even know how to clip snowboots onto ski's before today.

    I will definately return again (at quite a large monetry cost, they are expensive!) to complete the beginners lessons and hopefully move onto the main slope before I go on a skiing holiday next winter.

    Has anyone else on here learnt to ski from scratch at these places prior to going on a skiing holiday?

    Also does anybody have any advice for somebody who walks with their feet at "10 to 2"? Would I be more suited to snowboarding? It is a bit more effort and strain on my ankles to keep the skis parallel while skiing but I think I could handle it once I get better.
     
    Last edited: 30 May 2010
  2. Jimbeam3678

    Capodecina

    Joined: 8 Dec 2002

    Posts: 18,125

    Location: North Yorkshire

    Just go snowboarding , far easier to pick up and more fun IMO.

    The indoor ski slopes are good to give you the basics and confidence. Stick with skiing / snowboarding is awesome fun
     
  3. Skillmister

    Capodecina

    Joined: 3 Oct 2009

    Posts: 19,786

    Location: Wales

    I learnt to snowboard at Xscape, had 4 lessons, was very very useful.

    However i learnt to ski while on holiday, just strapped them on went up a lift and learnt on the way down a blue run :D My dad did the same with snowboarding after being a skiier for 20 years so we learnt a new thing at the same time on an easy run. Obviously he was boarding so fell over a lot more than me ;)

    If i were you i'd give snowboarding a go for 1 lesson and see how you like it. Be prepared to fall over a lot and only spend an hour edging slowly down but it will give you a feel for it at least.
     
  4. Morba

    Caporegime

    Joined: 7 Mar 2003

    Posts: 28,189

    Location: Krispy Kreme drive thru

    I'd say learn to do both. Being able to ski opens up a lot more to you on the mountains (as a beginner) imo.
     
  5. Deanje

    Hitman

    Joined: 16 Oct 2006

    Posts: 527

    Location: U.K.

    Completely disagree; I think skis are much easier to strap on and throw yourself down a slope.

    I've only been to Chillfactor once, the main problem with it is the length of the lift queue compared to the slope length. I suppose it's more of a criticism of artificial slopes rather than Chillfactor itself.
     
  6. semi-pro waster

    Man of Honour

    Joined: 27 Sep 2004

    Posts: 25,829

    Location: Glasgow

    I've only been to an Xscape once and while it's nowhere near as good as going on real slopes with non-artificial snow it's a good way to introduce yourself. The short length of run when compared to the queue for the tows is less of a problem I feel as a beginner, it's handy to allow people to catch their breath as it is pretty tiring when starting out using muscles that you wouldn't normally.

    Without knowing you it's difficult to say if snowboarding would be more suited for you but you can certainly set the snowboard up in a 'ducky' stance which would be very close to the position of your feet normally as you describe it. Have a word with the ski/snowboard rental people and ask for their advice, they should be able to give a fair opinion.
     
  7. Gaijin

    Don

    Joined: 18 Feb 2003

    Posts: 8,557

    Location: Brighton/West Wicklow

    Xscape is good for learning and for the odd off season/ off hols "fix" but little more than that.

    Once you get good, and unless you are doing the kickers or rails, you'll spend by far more time on the lift than on the slope.
     
  8. CoxyBoy123

    Gangster

    Joined: 30 Oct 2009

    Posts: 480

    Location: Halifax, West Yorkshire

    Been to both as I live in the middle of them,

    Chill Factore is by far beter, only bonus with Xscape is the ramps,
    the snow is better and run is wider at chill factore........although me and my friends worked out its 4 and half minutes lift time to 10 seconsd run tiem
     
  9. Skillmister

    Capodecina

    Joined: 3 Oct 2009

    Posts: 19,786

    Location: Wales

    This is the problem.
     
  10. shroomz

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 18 Feb 2010

    Posts: 2,021

    Location: Glasgow, UK

    It doesn't even compare to real snow, but I learned to board on an indoor slope, was good fun. I suggest you try both boarding and skiing and see if you prefer one.

    In my experience its easier to just pick up skiing but harder to get good at it if you see what I mean
     
  11. platypus

    Caporegime

    Joined: 25 Jul 2003

    Posts: 39,140

    Location: Rhône-Alpes+Cambridge

    We're finally going to go skiing next year, touch wood, and I want to try one of these places for lessons before going, probably going to go to MK snowdome. 'Tis expensive though.
     
  12. Tomsk

    Soldato

    Joined: 18 Oct 2002

    Posts: 5,230

    Location: Overground, underground..

    My advice is to not bother with anything other than initial taster sessions on the indoor slopes.

    It's too expensive for anything else. The price of a single lesson a Chill FactorE is £60 - that's about weeks boot, ski or board hire, or a few days pass on a real ski slope.
     
  13. platypus

    Caporegime

    Joined: 25 Jul 2003

    Posts: 39,140

    Location: Rhône-Alpes+Cambridge

    Aye it's quite expensive, £75 for a 3 hour one on one sounds decent though so I think I'll do that, then see if I get bitten!
     
  14. physichull

    Sgarrista

    Joined: 22 Sep 2008

    Posts: 9,530

    Location: Warrington

    I think there was a deal on for a weekend of begginers skiing lessons, for 3 people it was £200. Quite a good deal there.
     
  15. BenjiSayers

    Mobster

    Joined: 13 Dec 2006

    Posts: 3,016

    I'm hoping to go back to the Xscape near Leeds again to finish off my Snowboarding lessons. I went last year but never finished it as some lass who had no control over where she was going went in to me at full speed and launched me down the hill and I hurt my lower back so that was my day over :(
     
  16. tsinc80697

    Sgarrista

    Joined: 10 Apr 2006

    Posts: 7,599

    Location: North West

    Hoping to go to Chill Factor for the first time this week. Any regulars know when's the best day/time to go? Going for either a taster lesson or beginner lesson, can't decide! Lessons are bleedin expensive!
     
  17. physichull

    Sgarrista

    Joined: 22 Sep 2008

    Posts: 9,530

    Location: Warrington

    I went for the taster session and it was all too brief, I'd recommend go for the one that last longest. I needed the taster as I didn't even know how to put a ski boot onto a ski!

    A word of warning though, any lessons you go in are in groups of mixed ages. This can become quite a problem when somebody thinks its a good idea for a 4 year old to have a go, for a bit of a laugh. The problem is, the young kids doing these lessons take up loads of instructor time and you just end up waiting around half the time for your "go down the slope", which is all very fleeting.
     
  18. tsinc80697

    Sgarrista

    Joined: 10 Apr 2006

    Posts: 7,599

    Location: North West

    Ah, I might try to get as late a night as possible then. Might be fewer kids then?

    I have no idea how to put a pair of boots on a snowboard but it's not worth £30 to tell me that, sure they could just tell me in the beginner one?

    £200 if I pay as 3 separate lessons. £160 if I book all 3 in advance. Only wanted to get 1 lesson to see if I liked it but might as well grab 3 lessons for £160 as I'm sure it'll be good!
     
    Last edited: 8 Nov 2010
  19. semi-pro waster

    Man of Honour

    Joined: 27 Sep 2004

    Posts: 25,829

    Location: Glasgow

    It depends on the type of bindings but easily the most common would simply be strap bindings and if you can't work them out for yourself then I might entertain doubts whether you should really be trying any sports at all. Flows/K2 Cinch, step-ins and the rest are all pretty simple too - it's definitely not worth a lesson for that.

    However it is probably worth a lesson after you've mastered standing up and edging to learn how to turn - too many people use force or jumping to do the turn. It should be an easy graceful flowing motion (at least until you get to advanced slopes when other techniques may be necessary) that requires little more than turning your head to where you want to go - it's something that few people seem to realise but actually just turning your head to initiate the turn is usually enough, your body tends to follow where your eyes lead.