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Compressing brake piston

Discussion in 'Motors' started by jsmoke, 5 Aug 2020.

  1. jsmoke

    Capodecina

    Joined: 17 Jun 2012

    Posts: 10,020

    No will be doing both but I'll see how one side goes. I won't be driving until both sides are done properly.

    I have unlimited breakdown so no problems.
     
  2. breadturbo

    Mobster

    Joined: 27 Oct 2005

    Posts: 2,540

    This is what I use on my minibuses and cars, £20 on an auction site and does the job with ease.

    Just search for 'caliper brake tool'
    [​IMG]
     
  3. Simon

    Capodecina

    Joined: 21 Oct 2002

    Posts: 23,913

    Location: Berks / Moscow

    Its a hydraulic system, you wont have any brakes! The piston will probably fall out of the caliper the first time you brake. Scary question to ask to be honest. So what about unlimited breakdown is just creating a risk to other drivers as you break down on the road.

    Give it to a mechanic, he will have a torque wrench too.
     
  4. jsmoke

    Capodecina

    Joined: 17 Jun 2012

    Posts: 10,020

    I'll be fine I'm over exaggerating.
     
  5. Simon

    Capodecina

    Joined: 21 Oct 2002

    Posts: 23,913

    Location: Berks / Moscow

    Not sure if trolling
     
  6. vanpeebles

    Sgarrista

    Joined: 22 Aug 2004

    Posts: 7,603

    Op arrives at work with bonnet covered in clothed washing lines and hens.
     
  7. jsmoke

    Capodecina

    Joined: 17 Jun 2012

    Posts: 10,020

    Or bodies.
     
  8. vanpeebles

    Sgarrista

    Joined: 22 Aug 2004

    Posts: 7,603

    Gulp.
     
  9. no idea what

    Capodecina

    Joined: 5 Oct 2009

    Posts: 10,768

    Location: Lincolnshire


    If you have to ask this, step away from the brakes.

    I can understand asking your original question, but if you have to ask this then, just no.
     
  10. skyripper

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 19 Jul 2011

    Posts: 2,143

    You're asking if it's fine to drive with defective brakes?

    More than two decades ago I worked on the brakes for my car. It was my first car. I didn't know what I was doing and thought it was all fine. My brakes worked. Until a caliper bolt fell out. My caliper rotated on the other bolt snapping the brake line meaning I had NO brakes. Every press of the pedal just squirted brake fluid out over the wheel. Handbrake and sheer luck stopped me crashing into anything.

    So yes, torque your bolts up properly. And don't ask about fitting the brakes back without pads.
     
  11. Semple

    Sgarrista

    Joined: 5 Mar 2010

    Posts: 8,018

    :D:D

    I'm all for people having a go at DIY on the car, but a) make sure you have the right tools before you start - maintenance & repairs go much smoother with the correct tools, b) make sure you know what it is you're doing. There's got to be a million youtube videos that talk you through step-by-step how to change brake pads + disks.
     
  12. jsmoke

    Capodecina

    Joined: 17 Jun 2012

    Posts: 10,020

    I won't be driving until I'm 100% satisfied it's all done properly. I would never drive on 3 brakes I was curious if it was possible. I like to do my research first before I embark on anything.

    I'll be buying a torque wrench.
     
  13. Simon

    Capodecina

    Joined: 21 Oct 2002

    Posts: 23,913

    Location: Berks / Moscow

    Often understanding fundamentals is a better way to approach rather than search google.

    The very operation of a hydraulic system means you don't understand it if asking the question of not having the pad in. You are risking other people if you even consider driving about in an unsafe car. Having no pad is physically the same is cutting the brake line, but the dual circuit is a safety feature which would help you out if you lost pressure on one side of the system.

    Be aware though, many rear calipers have a habit of seizing. not sure what car this is? A lot of Honda's have an awful rear caliper for UK, the seal lets water and salt in and the steel piston corrodes. ALso good practice to make sure the new pads fit in the carrier well, use a bit of grease to help slide. Don't just jam them in, some pads often need a light filing or the carrier cleaning up of any corrosion. Make sure the sliders are free too - again these can be regressed for optimum use.

    Rear handbrake shouldn't need adjusting, but good to check this is working freely too

    Don't let the caliper hang off the brake pipe either.
     
  14. gc123

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 19 Dec 2002

    Posts: 1,164

    exactly the same cant fault it had it for a couple of years and done all the family vehicles garage of dad :)
     
  15. Nasher

    Capodecina

    Joined: 22 Nov 2006

    Posts: 19,563

    I also have one of those cheap kits :)
     
  16. bainbridge

    Mobster

    Joined: 9 Dec 2009

    Posts: 4,018

    Location: Bristol

    I've always done this since one Haynes manual for a car I owned said if dirty fluid is pushed back up the brake line it can foul the abs sensor, though admittedly that I've no idea if that's the case on most cars or just this one.

    At the very least changing pads this way makes bleeding easier because clean fluid will come through quicker.
     
  17. bainbridge

    Mobster

    Joined: 9 Dec 2009

    Posts: 4,018

    Location: Bristol

    Yes I've got one of these too and they make the job much easier.
     
  18. Phemo

    Soldato

    Joined: 6 May 2004

    Posts: 5,566

    Location: Portsmouth

    Exactly the kit I've got too. Had it for over 5 years now and while it's a little rusty, it still works perfectly. Done many cars with it, well worth the £15 I paid for it.
     
  19. Amos91

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 8 Oct 2008

    Posts: 1,990

    Location: Northamptonshire

    Single piston design... just use a G clamp with one side inside the piston.
     
  20. Simon

    Capodecina

    Joined: 21 Oct 2002

    Posts: 23,913

    Location: Berks / Moscow

    Not if they are rears with a handbrake mechanism