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diy advice needed

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by WIBSBOT, 13 Jul 2006.

  1. WIBSBOT

    Hitman

    Joined: 26 Sep 2003

    Posts: 834

    Location: essex

    Need a bit of help for a DIY noob...

    Part 1 - Decorating
    Just had the hallway replastered. Can I paint directly on the plaster or do I need to seal it somehow ? - The plasterer mentioned that the plaster would soak up the water in the paint and the paint would just flake off. - Is this likely ?
    How many coats of paint should I use ?

    Part 2 - Fireplace

    I am currently removing the fireplace in our lounge as it looks small and rubbish. I am having a bit of trouble removing the backplate because it is concreted in.

    What's the best tool/s to use for cracking through the concrete ? I only have a small chisel and hammer at the moment and it's ok for getting the bricks out but doesn;t even touch the concrete.

    I don't want to replace the fireplace and just intend to make a feature with the space left by the fireplace.
    What can I do about the draft from the chimney ? - Can you get balloons to stop the draft, and do they work, or should I get it boarded-up ?
     
  2. Visage

    PermaBanned

    Joined: 13 Jan 2005

    Posts: 10,708

    Part One: http://www.diydoctor.org.uk/projects/paintnewplaster.htm

    Part 2: Hire an SDS drill and a chisel bit.
     
  3. daveyj27

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 18 Oct 2002

    Posts: 1,231

    Location: NH USA (Brit Expat)

    You can seal the plaster by applying a water/PVA mix.
     
  4. amaru

    Gangster

    Joined: 11 Jul 2006

    Posts: 353

    Location: Cardiff

    I had the same problem with my fireplace and the best way to hack through concrete/brick is with a handheld Kango Drill (Handheld Jack Hammer) which can be hired for about £20 a day.
     
  5. phykell

    Mobster

    Joined: 18 Oct 2002

    Posts: 4,410

    Part 2 - you need some sort of breaker. I'd suggest one of those cheap SDS 850W or 1kW breakers that the various DIY sheds sell for around £30 to £40. Keep your receipt and make sure the thing is well greased. Leave it to cool for regular, short periods whilst in use and it should last the job. Otherwise just take it back if it blows. The breakers usually come with an SDS tool kit which will include chisels.
     
  6. WIBSBOT

    Hitman

    Joined: 26 Sep 2003

    Posts: 834

    Location: essex

    Thanks for your replies :) :) - I can't believe that I had never heard of an SDS drill before. I think I might have to get one.

    Any recommendations on makes/models to get (or more importantly ones to avoid) ?

    - I was going to spend about £150 on someone to remove the backplate, render and plaster the fireplace so I can afford £100 - £120 if I do it myself.

    Still need a little help on 'blocking' the chimney to stop the drafts now.
     
    Last edited: 13 Jul 2006
  7. phykell

    Mobster

    Joined: 18 Oct 2002

    Posts: 4,410

    IMO, there are two SDS tools to own for the DIYer, one for breaking and one for general drilling. Here are some examples:

    Breaking:

    http://www.toolstation.com/images/library/stock/webbig/17425.jpg

    Drilling:

    http://www.toolstation.com/images/library/stock/webbig/72343.jpg

    As it happens, Screwfix have got a great offer on at the moment:

    http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/pro.jsp?cId=101377&ts=88227&id=45647

    I bought one myself and it's a great drill, far better than a conventional hammer drill. They make much lighter work of drilling masonary and the quality of the bits is generally higher IMO. My own house is very old and has solid 9" thick walls with incredibly hard bricks but my SDS drill has no problems getting through it :)
     
  8. VIRII

    PermaBanned

    Joined: 24 Jul 2003

    Posts: 30,259

    You can use thinned down emulsion as well. Very thinned. Mind you the PVA needs to be very thinnned down too.


    As for how many coats?
    I personally use a couple of coats of really thinned down emulsion, then put up a base coat of white (sometimes twice) and then 2 or 3 coats of the top colour depending on the paint.
    Some paint seems better and to require less coats than others. I've given up on B&Qs own stuff on newly plastered walls and gone for Dulux - partly because that dulux mix to order stuff has such a huge range.
     
  9. Bill101

    Soldato

    Joined: 18 Oct 2002

    Posts: 5,550

    Location: Liverpool

    you can buy paint for newly plastered walls but there is a limited range of colours(white,magnolia and other pale colours) You can get them from building supply places.
    You can block up the chimney with a 'trap door' type of closure, it's a frame that goes in the flue with a spring loaded door.I cannot remember the correct name for it though :confused: Don't forget though, you should have some ventilation in the flue to stop condensation
     
  10. WIBSBOT

    Hitman

    Joined: 26 Sep 2003

    Posts: 834

    Location: essex

    Thanks for all your help.

    I had an SDS drill delivered on Saturday (from Screwfix), and it is soo much better at removing the cement than I thought it would be. Some other little issues I've got now, which no doubt I'll find a way round.

    Just wanted to say thanks for the useful advice. :)