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Garlic Puree

Discussion in 'La Cuisine' started by Stretch, 21 Aug 2018.

  1. Stretch

    Capodecina

    Joined: 14 Feb 2004

    Posts: 12,357

    Location: Peoples Republic of Histonia, Cambridge

    Does anyone own a mini chopper/processor and could tell me if it's any good for making garlic/ginger/curry pastes in relatively small quantities e.g. a single bulb of garlic.

    There's lot of models available that look like they might do the job, but I'm not sure if the blades are low enough in the machine to puree smaller quantities.
     
  2. Raymond Lin

    Capo Crimine

    Joined: 20 Oct 2002

    Posts: 66,222

    Location: Wish i was in .Lethal's house

    Get one of those hand crusher.
     
  3. kthula666

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 9 May 2012

    Posts: 2,072

    Location: Aberdeen

  4. rhysduck

    Soldato

    Joined: 25 Oct 2009

    Posts: 6,392

    Location: Nelson, South Wales

    We buy Ginger / Garlic paste in pots....
     
  5. Stretch

    Capodecina

    Joined: 14 Feb 2004

    Posts: 12,357

    Location: Peoples Republic of Histonia, Cambridge

    I’m really hoping for something that means I don’t have to get my hands smelly. Also something I can use for ginger and curry pastes which I don’t think a hand press can do?

    I’ve tried the stuff in pots/tubes and for some reason I find it never quite packs the same punch as freshly pressed.
     
  6. Marvt74

    Capodecina

    Joined: 20 Feb 2004

    Posts: 14,722

    Location: Higher Walton

    I've got a normal type one that i think you're looking for, but it's not great for small quantities as like you say the blades don't get to the bottom/the edges.

    Could you not make in batches and freeze?
     
  7. Stretch

    Capodecina

    Joined: 14 Feb 2004

    Posts: 12,357

    Location: Peoples Republic of Histonia, Cambridge

    Is it something like this?

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Bosch-MMR0...&qid=1534858053&sr=8-13&keywords=mini+chopper

    For £28 I thought what the hell and ordered to give it a try. I'll report back :)

    I was thinking if the blades aren't quite low enough I might be able to use a small amount of water or oil to top it up...
     
  8. Marvt74

    Capodecina

    Joined: 20 Feb 2004

    Posts: 14,722

    Location: Higher Walton

    Yeah, thats the style i have (not that exact one though)

    It is handy do making curry pastes etc, but much better if you're including onions as they start off quite chunky so bash everything else around.
     
  9. Mr.E.

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 18 Oct 2002

    Posts: 1,402

    Location: middle of nowhere

    Make a bigger batch and freeze the rest in ice cube trays, perfect amount each time.
     
  10. Marvt74

    Capodecina

    Joined: 20 Feb 2004

    Posts: 14,722

    Location: Higher Walton

    That's a superb idea :)
     
  11. Stretch

    Capodecina

    Joined: 14 Feb 2004

    Posts: 12,357

    Location: Peoples Republic of Histonia, Cambridge

    Do you find it affects the flavour?

    I've tried shop bough frozen garlic cubes and it just isn't the same as fresh garlic.

    You need to use a lot more, and the flavour is slightly odd. Maybe they just use different, lower quality garlic.
     
  12. Marvt74

    Capodecina

    Joined: 20 Feb 2004

    Posts: 14,722

    Location: Higher Walton

    Whilst not home-made paste, i freeze fresh garlic, ginger and lemon grass and find it doesn't affect the taste.

    EDIT - Actually, i don't freeze garlic but the others always come out ok.
     
  13. robfosters

    Haby Birtdoy

    Joined: 1 Dec 2010

    Posts: 35,716

    Location: Welling, London

    I use the frozen in ice cubes method. Works a treat. A teaspoon in every block. Flavour is exactly the same once thawed.

    Once in the hot pan it thaws in seconds.
     
  14. Scam

    Capodecina

    Joined: 20 Oct 2002

    Posts: 13,831

    Location: London

    We use a garlic press too. Have done for years. Just pop a clove in whole (no need to remove skin), crush it into the pan, then use the tip of a knife to pull the skin out. Voila, no garlic hands. Easy.
     
  15. jpaul

    Capodecina

    Joined: 1 Mar 2010

    Posts: 11,616

    (can you) could you have put ginger in a garlic press anyway. ?

    I Always grate garlics on a smallish grater - no waste, and, as long as you have dry cool hands, and rinse under cold water afterwards no smell.
    It oxidises fast, so do it as I need it ... without preservatives how does bought garlic paste survive.

    Have never tried the traditional, mix with pinch of salt and crush with knife edge on chopping block ... seems that would create a mess.
     
  16. Mr.E.

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 18 Oct 2002

    Posts: 1,402

    Location: middle of nowhere

    It'd be too fibrous for a garlic press. In this instance for a G&G paste, I peel mine with a tea spoon, chop in to a few bits and in its goes.
     
  17. Stretch

    Capodecina

    Joined: 14 Feb 2004

    Posts: 12,357

    Location: Peoples Republic of Histonia, Cambridge

    I’m regularly crushing 5-10 cloves at a time though. It’s difficult not to get a fair amount on you fingers. I’ve tried most things, steel soap etc which help but I still get that garlicy smell in the morning when washing my hair, or in meeting 3 days later.
     
  18. Scottland

    Capodecina

    Joined: 18 Oct 2002

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    Location: North Wales

    You can buy cubes of frozen garlic or ginger from some supermarkets, handy to keep in the freezer but I still tend to use fresh more often as it always seems fresher/more pungent.
     
  19. tom_nieto

    Capodecina

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    Location: Birmingham

  20. valve90210

    Mobster

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