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Guitar 2 PC

Discussion in 'Sound City' started by dantonkin, 12 Apr 2006.

  1. dantonkin

    Gangster

    Joined: 6 Jun 2005

    Posts: 467

    Location: Portsmouth

    I currently have a very old Soundblaster Live in my system along with a Tascam mixer (4input thing) to plug mics/guitar etc for recording into the computer.

    I'm lining out from the mixer using 2xphono - 2 - 3.5mm jack into the mic port. I gather this isnt the best way to do it, so what is?

    Cheers

    Dan
     
  2. Codmate

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 5 Nov 2002

    Posts: 1,575

    Location: Cardiff | UK

    Well - since you have a mixer with some preamps in it already (I'm assuming here - most mixers have pre's in them), that will save you some cash.

    I'd get yourself a new soundcard for recording.
    Good options include the EMU 0404, M-Audio AudioPhile 2496 and M-Audio AudioPhile 192.

    These all have RCA inputs (apart from the 0404 - which uses 1/4"), which means you don't need any adaptor cables - just a nice pair of RCA's (or RCA > 1/4" for the 0404) :)

    If you have any more cash to spend - get your hands on some nice pre's.
    The ART Tube MP Studio V3 would be a great buy IMO and really improve your sound.
    http://www.dolphinmusic.co.uk/page/shop/flypage/product_id/3561
     
    Last edited: 12 Apr 2006
  3. dantonkin

    Gangster

    Joined: 6 Jun 2005

    Posts: 467

    Location: Portsmouth

    Cheer for the reply boss. those soundcards look the biz. Think i'll invest in one the AudioPhile cards.

    Cheers again for the help
     
  4. Codmate

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 5 Nov 2002

    Posts: 1,575

    Location: Cardiff | UK

    No probs - I've just had a look and it seems both the 0404 and 192 have 1/4" inputs, so the Audiophile 2496 is the only one with RCA inputs.

    Have fun with your recordings :)
     
  5. dantonkin

    Gangster

    Joined: 6 Jun 2005

    Posts: 467

    Location: Portsmouth

    yeah i did notice that.

    Another quickie, may not be the right place to ask as its software related. but seeing as though u seem to know whats what I'll ask you.

    Whats the best music looping/layering/efx prgramme around for noob use? I'm using Fruityloops for my drum patterns right now & Cool Edit Pro.
     
  6. Codmate

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 5 Nov 2002

    Posts: 1,575

    Location: Cardiff | UK

    Not sure really - I'm not that up on software.
    I kinda use Cubase and a bit of Fruityloops, and those do everything I need.

    I'm too old to learn new things - lol.

    I'm sure others can advise here though :)
     
  7. SexyGreyFox

    Man of Honour

    Joined: 29 Mar 2003

    Posts: 51,670

    Location: Stoke on Trent

    Easily the best way to get a great guitar sound into your PC is with one of the Line6 products.
    Either the Guitarport or the Toneport.

    www.line6.com
     
  8. jeffa123

    Hitman

    Joined: 30 Apr 2004

    Posts: 584

    Location: UK

    Yeah, I have to agree. Line 6 is the way to go. I have a Pod XT which just plugs into a USB port and Windows device manager lets you use it as an Audio device. The good thing about the Pod XT is that there is no need for any amp. It emulates just about every amp on the market and allows you to define your own sound setup. Initially expensive £350-£450 but you can save a lot more time and expense comared to elaborate sound cards. Use your existing sound alonside the POD XT and you have a marriage of instrument and PC. With the help of programs like Steinburg's Cubase or Sonic you can sample your sounds to your heart's content.
     
  9. SexyGreyFox

    Man of Honour

    Joined: 29 Mar 2003

    Posts: 51,670

    Location: Stoke on Trent

    Don't scare him :D

    You can get a Guitarport for £89 which will give you hundreds of top quality sounds and its what I use on all my recordings.
    I think the cheaper Toneport comes in at £99.
     
  10. Codmate

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 5 Nov 2002

    Posts: 1,575

    Location: Cardiff | UK

    Don't get me wrong - the modeling stuff is great for demos and practice, and it is by far the easiest way to get a guitar sound into the PC.

    The original poster did say he was going to be using mics though, which means he needs a decent recording sound card.

    A mic (SM57 is the classic guitar-cab mic) and good amp will always give you a far better sound than an amp modeler too.

    Of all the modelers I've heard I think the Vox Tonelab is probably the best, and is something I might even consider taking on tour instead of a backup amp - but only for real emergencies, as it could never come withing sounding even 5% as good as my Fender CVR with a 57 in front of it :)
     
  11. dantonkin

    Gangster

    Joined: 6 Jun 2005

    Posts: 467

    Location: Portsmouth

    I did get my hands on a mixer in the end. Guy I lived with actually had one at his parents house, so no longer using the mic into soundcard setup.

    To be honest i'm not the most musically gifted person, and as i've only just started to learn to play the guitar, this 4 chan tascam mixer does the job just right.

    Theres quite a lot of hiss when recording into the computer, but the software can soft this out.

    Also for some reason i cannot record from two channels into the comp at any one time. For example. Singing into the mic and playing the gitbox at the same time.. One of the channels goes crazy..
     
  12. SexyGreyFox

    Man of Honour

    Joined: 29 Mar 2003

    Posts: 51,670

    Location: Stoke on Trent

    I've got about 12 x SM57's (mainly for stage) around the place but taking GordyR's advice I bought a Studio Electronics Condensor microphone which is way better for recording into PC's and also recording vocals/acoustic guitars etc.
     
  13. Andelusion

    Capodecina

    Joined: 1 Oct 2003

    Posts: 14,339

    Location: Huddersfield

    I'd advise against the M-Audio 192, I wish i'd gotten the 2496, the 192 doesn't have a main out stereo connector so if you're running computer speakers with one 3.5mm input you're a bit screwed, the labelling on the output jacks is also impossible to read unless you're under direct light, not very practical when they're dangling behind your pc. It's all well and good if you've got some dedicated monitors though.
     
  14. Codmate

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 5 Nov 2002

    Posts: 1,575

    Location: Cardiff | UK

    Sure - if somebody was to ask how to get a great guitar sound, I'd probably say, put it in a really echoey garage, close mic with a 57, rear mic with a hypercardioid (or shotgun) condensor and ambient mic the front with a stereo pair of Neuman's (or NTK's) at about 6 to ten feet.

    But the classic, and cheap, way of doing things is a 57 on the speaker; and it's a great place to start.
     
  15. Codmate

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 5 Nov 2002

    Posts: 1,575

    Location: Cardiff | UK

    You're using an Audiophile 192 with PC Speakers?! :eek:

    There's no excuse when reasonable monitors are this cheap:
    http://www.dolphinmusic.co.uk/page/shop/flypage/product_id/3873
     
  16. georges

    Mobster

    Joined: 5 Apr 2006

    Posts: 3,083


    I know I've been sounding like a fanboy every time I've posted about it, but I researched the emus and m audios and found the emus to be better for what I do (recording guitar, some synth stuff). High quality, simple, cheap, easy and comes with lots of cut down versions of software(sonar le, proteus le, cakewald le, amplitube le etc).

    Really good stuff. + no monitoring latency as it has 0 latency monitoring feature so you can use your speakers as an amp type thing.
     
  17. georges

    Mobster

    Joined: 5 Apr 2006

    Posts: 3,083

    I've done recordings with fruity loops and apart from the actual recording part which is a shambles, it's pretty good (Did one of my gcse compositions on it).

    Cubase is better for recording and you can use fruity loops as a plugin using the "Thingybob" (forgotten name) which basically makes it play the loops you've made for the song when recording and exporting as the drum track :)

    I liked cubase more than sonar.