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HELP - cant secure the heatsink firmly

Discussion in 'General Hardware' started by wesley, 19 Oct 2009.

  1. wesley

    Soldato

    Joined: 29 Jul 2003

    Posts: 7,448

    hi guys

    i need your help - i just tried install the intel retail heatsink for i5, on gigabyte P22M-UD2 motherboard

    i use flat headed screwdriver, i press the that thingy down hard then twist it to left. done that on all 4 but the heatsink is loose if i move it a little

    what i am doing wrong?

    cheers
     
  2. setter

    Caporegime

    Joined: 14 Dec 2005

    Posts: 28,160

    Location: armoy, n. ireland

    Id suggest pressing one pin down then do the one diagonally opposite, repeat for the other pins. Sometimes they do need quite a bit of pressure to get them to click into place. On the few ocassions i used a stock cooler i actually found it better to fit it prior to screwing the mobo into the case, this way you can confirm that the pins are making good contact.
     
  3. wesley

    Soldato

    Joined: 29 Jul 2003

    Posts: 7,448

    how matter how hard i press down before twist to left. it wont secure the heatsink firmly at all

    i'm bloody stressed now :p
     
  4. wesley

    Soldato

    Joined: 29 Jul 2003

    Posts: 7,448

    never mind, the heatsink was already broken :rolleyes:

    gotta buy new cooler grrrrr
     
  5. Plec

    Capodecina

    Joined: 19 Apr 2003

    Posts: 13,442

    The push pin method of fitting a heatsink is pathetic. I went through similar ordeal to yourself on my first introduction to them – I have never used them again.

    As ‘setter’ has already suggested it's easier to fit with the MB outside of the case. I ended up using a screwdriver and an insane amount of pressure to fit my Akasa - and when it was eventually securely in place my MB had bowed significantly :/.

    I have since bought a bolt-thru-kit and buy them when ever a heatsink uses the push in method. I highly recommend that you buy a new HS and buy a bolt-thru-kit if required.

    Below is an example for a 775 but they come in all socket flavours...

    [​IMG]
     
  6. wesley

    Soldato

    Joined: 29 Jul 2003

    Posts: 7,448

  7. Plec

    Capodecina

    Joined: 19 Apr 2003

    Posts: 13,442

    You would need this version - link. Although it uses the push pin method so i would look out for a bolt-thru-kit to fit ~£8 or consider a cooler with a bracket fit.

    EDIT: This is within your first budget - link
     
    Last edited: 19 Oct 2009
  8. ETNiES

    Hitman

    Joined: 24 Sep 2009

    Posts: 569

    Location: Dublin

    I had the same problems fitting my Coggage, 3hours of fiddling around with it until I finally got it in place, and what's wrong with the cooler that you think its broke?
     
  9. death_looms

    Gangster

    Joined: 4 Oct 2007

    Posts: 443

    Location: Belfast

    +1 For a bolt-thru, use one myself on an OCZ Vendetta II, MUCH easier than the push pins, and you have piece of mind knowing it's not going to come crashing down on your gfx!
     
  10. ns400r

    Mobster

    Joined: 23 Apr 2004

    Posts: 3,579

    Location: UK, Near the middle......

    Not had any problems with the Intel push and click fittings and I've done a few.
    You don't push and twist to fit them. You only push until you hear/feel the click. The twist is only used when removing the clips.
     
  11. JonJ678

    Capodecina

    Joined: 22 Dec 2008

    Posts: 10,371

    Location: England

    I'm not fond of them. Not yet failed to fit a cooler using them, but I certainly avoid them wherever possible.

    The holes in the motherboard are 4mm across. Consequently M4 screws and nuts, with silicone/paper washers, work well as an alternative to the thermalright kit. You miss out on the backplate, but you're still ahead of the push pins and it costs about a quid.
     
  12. setter

    Caporegime

    Joined: 14 Dec 2005

    Posts: 28,160

    Location: armoy, n. ireland

  13. Plec

    Capodecina

    Joined: 19 Apr 2003

    Posts: 13,442

    Yep, this is a really cheap fix/alternative - you just have to be careful about how much pressure you apply when fixing. Make sure you tightnen the nuts using the same principle as the push pin - work in diagonals.

    Here’s a link to a 1156 kit – link - it shows a pictorial example of how a bolt-thru-kit should be fitted.

    EDIT: Setter, I've just used one of those rev 2 on my brothers rig - very impressed with the new backplate assembly and ease of removal.
     
    Last edited: 19 Oct 2009
  14. setter

    Caporegime

    Joined: 14 Dec 2005

    Posts: 28,160

    Location: armoy, n. ireland

    Its a godsend mate, on my previous s775 setup the cooler would still move about a bit even after the x bracket was fully secured, with this new style theres a larger dimple on the cross bracket that gives a more secure fit with the matching hole on the top side of the heatsink. No movement at all now.
     
  15. Plec

    Capodecina

    Joined: 19 Apr 2003

    Posts: 13,442

    Yeah, mine is the same - much as i hated the dramatic bowing of the pushpin at least my temps were lower.

    I'll probably upgrade to the rev 2 myself when i use this chip in my HTPC.
     
  16. HangTime

    Man of Honour

    Joined: 25 Oct 2002

    Posts: 28,192

    Location: Hampshire

    This pushpin nonsense is absolutely ATROCIOUS.
    I've been building pcs for over 10 years and while I am a long way from being an expert, I would have thought by now I would be able to handle fitting hs/fan without too much trouble.

    How wrong was I. My I5 setup was a nightmare and really stressful, the first hs+fan I bought (alpine 11) ended up snapping when I was screwing it on, because the first time I'd fixed it I wasn't getting proper contact and it was really loose, so I was screwing moderately tightly second time around.

    Next up I have my current Artic Cooling Freezer 7 Pro which while a better design (screwing down into something a bit more solid) and I'm reasonably happy with, was still a bitch messing about cramming those bloody pushpins down and then cringing as I screwed the heatsink on, thinking every little creek was a pin working it's way out. GRRRRRR!
     
  17. setter

    Caporegime

    Joined: 14 Dec 2005

    Posts: 28,160

    Location: armoy, n. ireland

    I hated the pushpins on a freezer 7 i had once, everytime i thought id got a pin through, a quick glance showed that it had splayed out and only one side of it had went through, nothing but a knuckle scraping curse, could never go back to them again.
     
  18. coupe69

    Mobster

    Joined: 20 Feb 2007

    Posts: 4,262

    Location: Staffs, UK.

    ^^^^This, I think the problem is people seem to think it's actually harder than it is. With the retail ones it's already set up for you to fit, just make sure each white plastic end is properly through the mainboard, then push down on each corner, couldn't be simpler tbh.

    [​IMG]
     
  19. Hotwired

    Sgarrista

    Joined: 17 Aug 2009

    Posts: 7,770

    ^^ What they said.

    Otherwise known as RTFM, it tells you how to install the cooler.

    You have the clips rotated clockwise before pushing them in, this is in fact how it will arrive to you. They then lock into place on the motherboard. you only need to push with a finger or thumb.

    To unlock the clips you stick a flat bladed screwdriver in and twist the clips anticlockwise.

    You were pushing each in then unlocking them. Repeatedly. Possibly explains the breakage while we're thinking about it.

    Oh well, something for next time.
     
  20. Showboat

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 11 Sep 2009

    Posts: 2,036

    Location: UK

    As the last 2 posters have said, it comes ready to push in, you only turn the screw if you want to take it out. The instruction manual makes it pretty idiot proof, by far the easiest cooler i have installed.