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Hive dual channel on a combi boiler

Discussion in 'Home and Garden' started by GeX, 27 Aug 2017.

  1. GeX

    Soldato

    Joined: 17 Dec 2002

    Posts: 6,489

    Location: Manchester

    Hi.

    I have a Hive Dual channel receiver that I'd like to install on SIME Friendly Format 100E combi boiler.

    Boiler manual;

    http://library.plumbase.co.uk/flipbooks/RE/simefrif100e_22917_t/simefrif100e_22917_t.html

    Wiring diagrams;

    https://imgur.com/a/WjWzr

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The manual says that if a room thermostat is to be used I need to remove the bridge from terminals 22 & 23 (connector TA). It says it should class II EN 60730.1 (clean contact).

    My intention is to use this connection, and just leave the inbuilt timer set to 'ON'.

    I've interpreted the wiring diagram to mean that 22 is common and 23 is what needs a connection to request heat.

    Switching 230v for the thermostat seems wrong to me, but that's what is usual on heating systems isn't it?

    So my plan is to remove the 22 & 23 bridge from TA, leave 22 unconnected and then connect terminal 4 from the Hive to terminal 23. This way, when the Hive requests heat it will connect live to pin 23 on the boiler.

    Does that seem correct?
     
  2. HardwareGeek

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 17 Oct 2010

    Posts: 1,074

    Your plan will work fine - all depends on if the boiler has 230v output on 22 to room stat -

    The single channel hive has common terminal at 1 to account for possible ELV used so it just uses what the boiler gives i.e. 22 > 23
    The dual doesn't have this option and uses mains 230v from the L terminal to send to 4 so boiler must be able to take 230v on the stat terminal 23 etc

    So just need to know if it can take 230v

    Do you have a multimeter to measure 22 to earth? to see what its outputting, couldn't see in the manual, didnt seem to state what is used


    Ps. would have thought it is 230v othewise manual would normally have a warning about 230v causing damage and about which stats are compatible etc

    Best to double check or could blow the PCB

    Pps. It does say on page 12 240v stats - so should be ok
     
    Last edited: 27 Aug 2017
  3. GeX

    Soldato

    Joined: 17 Dec 2002

    Posts: 6,489

    Location: Manchester

    Thanks for the confirmation :)

    It is an old boiler, and it seems that lower voltage switching is only on newer boilers.

    I will double check 22 to confirm that it is providing 230V (would testing to earth not trip the RCD?).
     
  4. GeX

    Soldato

    Joined: 17 Dec 2002

    Posts: 6,489

    Location: Manchester

    I removed the link and checked 22 against the handy N that was close by, no voltage there. But 23 was showing mains voltage, so this should be fine to connect terminal 4 on the Hive to 22 on the boiler.
     
  5. The_One

    Capodecina

    Joined: 27 Dec 2003

    Posts: 12,097

    why did you buy a hive dual channel for a combi
     
  6. GeX

    Soldato

    Joined: 17 Dec 2002

    Posts: 6,489

    Location: Manchester

    Just in case anyone finds this whilst searching (I didn't find much), it is all working fine.

    Removed link, connected terminal 4 on the Hive to 22 on the boiler.

    Prime Day, and there was no stock showing of the single channel.
     
  7. The_One

    Capodecina

    Joined: 27 Dec 2003

    Posts: 12,097

    how much was it on prime?
     
  8. GeX

    Soldato

    Joined: 17 Dec 2002

    Posts: 6,489

    Location: Manchester

    About £100 iirc
     
  9. DemonTraitor

    Associate

    Joined: 12 Jan 2009

    Posts: 51

    Hi

    I have a hive dual channel receiver, a drayton thermostat, and a valiant ecotec pro 30 combi...

    the thermostat only has a single wire controlling the heating, so how does the hive heating on/off connections wire up, if at all...

    Thank you

    Demon
     
  10. GeX

    Soldato

    Joined: 17 Dec 2002

    Posts: 6,489

    Location: Manchester

    You need to check the wiring diagrams for the boiler / thermostat. Does it switch using mains voltage? A quick Google suggests it does. If this is correct then you can use the dual channel. Is the thermostat mains powered? In short, power the receiver off that and connect terminal 4 of the Hive to the line that currently goes to the boiler.
     
  11. DemonTraitor

    Associate

    Joined: 12 Jan 2009

    Posts: 51

    Sorted it. The Drayton RTS2 only has a "Call for Heat" so I just connected this to "HEATING ON" on the Dual Channel Hive 2 thermostat :)

    All working fine :)
     
  12. SquishScott

    Associate

    Joined: 6 Apr 2018

    Posts: 6

    Sorry to resurrect this thread, but I accidentally bought a dual channel hive reciever and want to connect this to me Baxi duo tec 24 Combi.

    This is the current connections with the salus thermostat that is being used.

    http://www.salus-tech.com/cache/fil...brary/2015/11/Salus-RT500RF-Manual-006-cr.pdf

    Boiler manual

    http://trade.baxi.co.uk/documents/Baxi_Duo-tec_Combi_ErP_Installation_and_Servicing_Manual.pdf

    Looking through your thread, my interpretation is that you did not connect the COM wire into the hive. Is that right? Im not sure if this would need to be the same step I would need to take as the dual channel doesn’t have a connection for COM. Cheers
     
    Last edited: 6 Apr 2018
  13. GeX

    Soldato

    Joined: 17 Dec 2002

    Posts: 6,489

    Location: Manchester

    Connecting 4 (Heating on) to bk1 on the boiler *should* work, but it does say in the manual

    This sounds like it's just saying that you should not try and power the external controls from the bk2 - fine. Not sure why it says the 230v signal must be taken from bk1 (implies it can't be an external source ie the Hive receiver)
     
  14. SquishScott

    Associate

    Joined: 6 Apr 2018

    Posts: 6

    Thanks for the reply and looking through the manuals.

    What would I do with the COM connection? On the current stat reciever, it has NO, COM, L and N connections.
     
  15. GeX

    Soldato

    Joined: 17 Dec 2002

    Posts: 6,489

    Location: Manchester

    I would assume COM is connected to bk2 on the boiler and just provides 230v to switch back into bk1 to call for heat. As the 230v signal will come from the Hive then you don't need the COM connection. As I say though, I can't see any reason why you have to use the signal from the boiler other than to ensure that when you isolate the boiler there is no chance of any of it being live (ie with 230v from Hive).

    I am not an electrician or work with any kind of boiler installation things.
     
  16. SquishScott

    Associate

    Joined: 6 Apr 2018

    Posts: 6

    So I’ve opened up the terminals in the boiler.

    I think your right that bk1 need to connect to terminal 4. The cable connecting com on the receiver unit is connected to bk2. So am I safe in thinking I can disconnect the cable from bk 2 and then not connect that into the hive. Just leaving bk 1 and terminal 4 connected?

    Or do I need to connect the com wire else wgere to complete the circuit?
     
    Last edited: 7 Apr 2018
  17. TallPaul1878

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 21 Oct 2012

    Posts: 2,332

    COM is common, that's just another live terminal. A time clock will need a permanent live and neutral to operate it's clock. The rest of it is simply a switch. So common is the live side and NO (normally open) is the load side.

    Normally open means just that, like a gate, it is left open so electricity does not flow through it. When the time clock operates it closes the circuit and electricity flows through it.

    The NO connection is always the one that switches back to the boiler firing it up.

    If you have, for example, a 3 core cable going to the programmer then you will be using brown for LIVE, grey for NEUTRAL and black for N.O. (Heating On). You are missing a cable to connect to Common so all you need to do is link it across from the permanent live connection. Job done
     
  18. SquishScott

    Associate

    Joined: 6 Apr 2018

    Posts: 6

    “If you have, for example, a 3 core cable going to the programmer then you will be using brown for LIVE, grey for NEUTRAL and black for N.O. (Heating On). You are missing a cable to connect to Common so all you need to do is link it across from the permanent live connection. Job done”

    I have a 4 core cable. Live and neutral are easy enough to wire in. I have figured out which cable goes into terminal 4 for the hive (heating on/NO connection. Where I am stuck is the COM wire. Do I unwire it on both ends, or do I connect it somewhere else on the boiler or the hive?[/QUOTE]
     
    Last edited: 7 Apr 2018
  19. SquishScott

    Associate

    Joined: 6 Apr 2018

    Posts: 6

    In addition, power to the thermastate via live and neutral from the boilers live and neutral (can you tell I’m a complete novice at this yet). Just want to make sense of the last two wires. Wishing I payed more attention and bought the single channel, but am determined to make this work!
     
  20. jren37

    Associate

    Joined: 19 May 2018

    Posts: 5

    Hi sorry I've hijacked this thread as I've got the same problem. I'm trying to wire a dual channel hive receiver (don't ask) to a heatline vizo 24 (clock has gone so can't program heating to come on and off).

    I've tried wiring it as single between 1&2 (did something - don't know what) and 1&3 did nothing which it wouldn't having now looked at the different wiring positions [​IMG] (dum dum)

    So now looking at the heatline 24 or 24 plus manual(there is variance but the theory is the same ) I should be able to wire direct to the pcb
    heatline 24 [​IMG] page 15 (9.5) states a mains thermo can be used and shows the connections on page 16 fig 9
    heatline 24 plus [​IMG] states the same except its pages 19 (9.5) & 20. (fig 8)
    So my first question is do I just link no4 on the receiver to the mains thermo connections (ie the side that has no voltage so that when activated it calls for heating and second do i need to bridge from the L in the receiver to no4 to provide the mains voltage? (thinking about it that seems obvious but would rather check as providing a live there surely would just mean the call is there all the time?:confused:) Confusing myself more now!


    (or could i get away with the low v terminals using 2&4? and no 230v because it definitely triggered something between 1&2 hmm just thought of that - may try that but would like answers to first questions as a back up in case the last idea doesn't work....