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Home network advice (config and equipment)

Discussion in 'Networks & Internet Connectivity' started by Mike1983, 16 Sep 2009.

  1. Mike1983

    Hitman

    Joined: 16 Nov 2007

    Posts: 791

    After doing my own research and getting some conflicting information I figured I would ask around in here to try and get some advice....

    Well I currently have a Virgin cable 50Mb connection and intend to run cat 5e cable all around the house with sockets in the key rooms. I intend to have all cables terminated onto a 16 port patch panel located adjacent to a 16 port switch which in turn is located next to the modem (all in the same cabinet). I also intend to install the Virgin supplied router to enable wireless connectivity.

    So first question is how do I connect all of this in the best way possible (or is there only 1 feasible way?). I have assumed there are 2 options as listed below described in order of connections if that makes sense.

    1) Modem - Switch - Outputs as necessary to key rooms plus 1 output to wireless router.

    or do I need to put the router before the switch thus

    2) Modem - Router - Switch - Outputs as necessary to key rooms

    And finally I was hoping you could advise if the spec of my equipment is sufficient / advise better alternatives. I'm more concerned / assuming this is only really critical to the choice of router with regards to stability, especially if it needs to be connected "before" the switch as in option 2 above

    Switch = Cisco SRW2016
    Patch Panel = Generic cat 5 / cat 6 patch panel (assume not too important)
    Modem = Standard Virgin modem
    Router = Standard Virgin supplied D-Link DIR 615

    For your info, the network is to be used for conectivity around the house plus streaming music and movies from a NAS drive, Popcorn Hour box, PS3 gaming in front room etc...

    So a lot of info, but any thoughts and advice would be very much appreciated.

    Thanks in advance

    Mike
     
  2. quickshot89

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 1 Feb 2009

    Posts: 2,041

    personally id use the router, have the switch connected into that, but also the ps3 conencted to the router, then set up the switch as you please with security etc, but like the ps3 outside of any rulling, and give it a static IP of say 192.168.1.2, and start the switch up with IP of 192.168.1.4

    but others may have different ideas
     
  3. SpiderX

    Gangster

    Joined: 7 Mar 2007

    Posts: 178

    Modem - Router - Switch, and as quickshot89 said you can plug ps3 directly to router
     
  4. J.B

    Soldato

    Joined: 16 Aug 2006

    Posts: 5,922

    I've just skim read the OP so sorry if you've mentioned this.

    But you would need the router to provided NAT, Routing and DHCP functions.

    So it would need to go
    Modem>Router>Switch
     
  5. PhillyDee

    Capodecina

    Joined: 12 Feb 2007

    Posts: 14,169

    Location: South Shields

    I have a similar system.

    Virgin 20mb --> Netgear Firewall Router --> 16-Port Netgear Gigabit Switch

    And everything is connected to the switch. (All cables terminated in a patch panel).
    I have a wireless access point which is also connected to the switch. + My WHS system, PS3, and 3 PC's. I have a laptop/netbook/Wii and an internet radio all streaming off the access point. Luckily, only ever 2 used at any one time . . . . :)
     
  6. Mike1983

    Hitman

    Joined: 16 Nov 2007

    Posts: 791

    Ok thanks for the replies guys ;)

    Ok first of all, the switch, patch panel and modem will be located in the office room (in same cabinet along with a NAS drive), the router will be on the landing for optimal WiFi and the PS3 will be located in the lounge so a direct connection from the PS3 to router will not really be feasible.

    I've drafted up an attempt at a network drawing for how I think it will look / be connected. Is there any possibility of reviewing and advising if suitable? It would be much appreciated ;)

    [​IMG]

    thanks again

    Mike
     
  7. Mike1983

    Hitman

    Joined: 16 Nov 2007

    Posts: 791

    bump....

    Does the above diagram seem like a valid proposal or would I need to make some changes?

    Thanks in advance

    Mike
     
  8. PhillyDee

    Capodecina

    Joined: 12 Feb 2007

    Posts: 14,169

    Location: South Shields

    No problems there at all.
     
  9. K.C. Leblanc

    Sgarrista

    Joined: 13 Sep 2003

    Posts: 8,116

    Location: Glocestershire

    Looks fine to me.

    Just make sure family members know they'll be beaten to within an inch of their lives if they unplug the router (or use a POE solution).
     
  10. Mike1983

    Hitman

    Joined: 16 Nov 2007

    Posts: 791

    Thanks for confirming it is feasible :)

    One last thing, I was going to use a Cisco SRW2016 16 port switch based on a friends recommendation.... I've since been reading some negative reviews though online.

    Do any of you have any better alternative by any chance?

    thanks

    Mike
     
  11. Meatball

    Soldato

    Joined: 12 Jun 2005

    Posts: 6,293

    Location: St Albans

    Kinda off-topic but how easy is it to fit cat5e cabling around the house? It's something I would like to have done but I imagine it's a messy and expensive job! I don't know if it justifies ripping plaster down.
     
    Last edited: 19 Sep 2009
  12. PhillyDee

    Capodecina

    Joined: 12 Feb 2007

    Posts: 14,169

    Location: South Shields

    Just the same as running any cables. Run under the floorboards. Then rither mount directly on the skirtingboard, or just leave the wire poking out. (Cheap easy ways). Or for the professional look, chisel out great big holes and plaster the wire into the wall like your power cables.
     
  13. K.C. Leblanc

    Sgarrista

    Joined: 13 Sep 2003

    Posts: 8,116

    Location: Glocestershire

    HP Procurve 1400-24G, or the 1800-24G if you want managed.
     
  14. wonko

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 21 Jul 2008

    Posts: 1,440

    Location: Outside the asylum

    I'd have a think about whether your office is the best place to route the 16+ cables to. It would make the comms cabinet a permanent feature there - is there any chance you (or future owner) could want to change rooms around at some point?
    FWIW, I put my patch panel in the airing cupboard out of the way. (http://forums.overclockers.co.uk/showpost.php?p=14816121&postcount=26 if you want to see). An understairs cupboard would do maybe. You'd have to get power there for the switch of course...
    A few other thoughts that might help:
    - It's always worth running more cables than you think you'll need (you don't have to terminate them). Have you got any need for phone sockets too, e.g. for a sky box in the lounge?
    - Before knocking holes in joists, have a read about limits on size of holes and where best to put them
    - Avoid running data cables parallel to mains cables. Separate by (IIRC) 30cm and cross at right angles if you can.
    - Leave enough slack in the cables (e.g. coiled under the floorboards)
    - While you're at it, what about running coax for TV/sat distribution, and cables for an alarm and/or home automation cables. Come to think of it, a few extra mains sockets round the house would be handy while you're there ;)
    - Prepare for a *lot* of mess if you're channelling into plaster and sinking back boxes. You'll need an old hoover, plus face mask and goggles (from shrapnel and dust), plus body armour and ear protection (if you're likely to get grief over the mess).
    HTH
     
  15. tolien

    Caporegime

    Joined: 16 May 2003

    Posts: 25,368

    Location: ::1

    They're not really Cisco switches though (in the sense that they don't run IOS and are pretty different from the Catalysts). They're only slightly more advanced than Linksys's unmanaged things and have a Cisco logo slapped on in the hope that people will associate them with something about ten times more expensive.

    I'd go with K.C. Leblanc's suggestion. The Procurves look like cracking switches for the price - I'm still procrastinating on buying an 1800-24G for myself.
     
  16. Mike1983

    Hitman

    Joined: 16 Nov 2007

    Posts: 791

    Thank you for the feedback, I've been reading more negative reviews on the Cisco switch so I think a change to your suggested HP Procurve 1800-24G will be necessary.

    Can anyone clarify if all ports from this Procurve switch run at full gigabit speed? I cannot find it definitively confired in the spec sheet. I ask because on one of the reviews for the Cisco item it suggested that only 4 of the 16 ports run at full speed.

    If I were to use the Procurve then I'd only be using 16 of the 24 ports but would like them all to have gigabit speed availability.

    thanks again

    Mike
     
  17. wij

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 27 Dec 2006

    Posts: 1,422

    Location: -

    The 1400-24G is the unmanaged 24 port Gigabit switch that HP do, you can get them for around £150 if you hunt around.

    Which unless you need a managed switch is the one I'd go for in your case, I use the little 8 port version at home and can't really complain about it.

    The 1400-24G has 24 copper ports + 2 slots for mini-gbic modules, all of which operate at 1Gbps.

    http://www.procurve.com/products/switches/HP_ProCurve_Switch_1400_Series/overview.htm

    Not too sure what spec sheet you've read but its quite clear on that one that all ports are 10/100/1000 capable.

    If you want VLAN support and the like you need the 1800-24G.
     
  18. Mike1983

    Hitman

    Joined: 16 Nov 2007

    Posts: 791

    much appreciated. Thank you all for your help.
     
  19. K.C. Leblanc

    Sgarrista

    Joined: 13 Sep 2003

    Posts: 8,116

    Location: Glocestershire

    The only thing I would say against the 1800-24g is although it's managed the managment interface isn't the same as the rest of the procurve range, you can't telnet/SSH it and you can't configure it with ProCurve manager.

    In some ways it is very much like what the Linksys/Cisco is to a Cisco Catalyst.

    However I've got three of them at work and none of them have even needed a manual reboot in two and a half years. Not something I've found with DLink or Netgear kit. I can't comment on Linksys/Cisco switches I've never used them.
     
  20. slylittlefox

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 24 Jun 2007

    Posts: 1,870

    Location: Landan.

    Indeed, the Web GUI is awful on the cheaper ProCurves. It comes to something when Telnet provides a better interface than a web app :(