1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Home wired network

Discussion in 'Networks & Internet Connectivity' started by sepulchre, 6 Apr 2021 at 11:38.

  1. sepulchre

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 30 Sep 2003

    Posts: 2,054

    Location: Not so Sunny Dundee

    I’m looking into setting up a wired network in my home, after getting really fed up with wifi, I just need some advice before buying the parts. I’m getting a company in to run the cables behind walls and terminate them but I will then add the networking hardware.

    I think I will need the following, please add anything I’ve forgotten :)

    - 6u network cabinet
    - power panel
    - 24 port gigabit managed switch with POE - any recommendations? I like the unifi switches although these look expensive but from what I’ve seen get decent reviews.
    - cat 6 cable, 305m drum - any dramas better than others or is cheapest also fine?
    - rj 45 plugs
    - wall plates

    thanks!
     
  2. Avalon

    Soldato

    Joined: 29 Dec 2002

    Posts: 6,411

    Stop. Why do you need a managed switch, PDU and 6u network cabinet... for one switch when you have seemingly managed previously on WiFi? Without knowing details, it’s all conjecture, but this feels like you may have got slightly over excited, or missed a lot of detail.
     
  3. sepulchre

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 30 Sep 2003

    Posts: 2,054

    Location: Not so Sunny Dundee

    The existing setup runs IPTV across the house from a central media PC with 4 sat feeds to a number of PC’s and fireTV cubes and to mobile devices when I’m travelling. In addition I have a NAS which serves media and 4 IP CCTV cameras which I’ll switch over to POE and move off the WiFi network.

    I’ll be running a couple of WiFi Access points and removing the current SKY router and sky WiFi AP or in the interim using these as WiFi AP’s.

    I figure a managed switch isn’t so much more cost vs an unmanaged one so better to use that and retire the sky gear now.

    I’ll be moving all the network gear to a closet in the hall where it’s going to be exposed to kids so a cabinet holding a patch panel and the switch seems a safer option.
     
  4. bremen1874

    Capodecina

    Joined: 20 Oct 2008

    Posts: 11,866

    If you're paying a company to run the cables let them supply the cable, patch panel, faceplates, etc.

    They'll buy what they know to work, and there'll be no arguments in the future if you have a bad connection.
     
  5. Relentless81

    Capodecina

    Joined: 18 May 2010

    Posts: 11,508

    I think people massively over complicate this, no offence intended but it can much simpler.

    I had a patch cable run from the router into the loft by drilling a hole in the wall and a weather proof insert on either side. then up the side of the house and into the loft.

    From there it goes into a TP Link Deco and a Switch where three more cables run down outside the house and into each bedroom into a wall mounted socket, the only issue is that the ports I used are the large ones that sit over the wall other than that its worked perfectly.
     
  6. sepulchre

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 30 Sep 2003

    Posts: 2,054

    Location: Not so Sunny Dundee

    trust me it was a short conversation with the wife, no cables down the outside of the house, they need to be routed internally and without damaging the walls/decorating. More chance of seeing god but there you go
     
  7. Relentless81

    Capodecina

    Joined: 18 May 2010

    Posts: 11,508

    You cant see them, at least I dont notice them and my wife never said anything about them either. The only one at the front of the house is the main one from router to loft and it sits right next to the TV Ariel cable so you just don't notice it. Saying that my house is old so if your house is much newer or much lighter brick they will be easier to spot.
     
  8. Avalon

    Soldato

    Joined: 29 Dec 2002

    Posts: 6,411

    Drain pipes provide excellent cover, heck I have even resorted to running cables inside them in extreme cases, just make sure that you take the feed out and up to prevent water ingress via the wall.
     
  9. WJA96

    Capodecina

    Joined: 13 Jul 2005

    Posts: 16,918

    Location: Norfolk, South Scotland

    The only thing I would chip in (from bitter experience) is make sure you get a cabinet deep enough for what you want to install in it.

    I originally bought a 450mm deep 6U cabinet for home. And I found out very quickly that a lot of bigger PoE switches could be too deep for a 450mm deep cabinet. So I bought a 600mm deep cabinet and then I wanted to add a server and they’re all at least 600mm deep so I ended up leaving the 6U cabinet on the wall and having an 18U floor-mounted frame to hold the servers.

    So just match up the cabinet depth with the switch depth and buy the right one (including any cable sticking out the back!)
     
  10. HungryHippos

    Sgarrista

    Joined: 25 Mar 2004

    Posts: 8,799

    Location: Fareham

    I had this done a while ago, ran a cable outside, up behind a drain pipe, and then into the loft. Honestly hard to tell it's there unless you know. It's certainly no worse than a sky TV cable or something.

    In the loft I had power (useful anyway) and a small switch installed near the loft hatch. This then feeds in to the office and the bedroom behind the TV.

    You don't necessarily need a big rack and a big switch, you might find some well-placed wifi discs or something could help some devices, and for the main locations having hard-wired faceplates will cover them. An 8 port switch in the loft will go a long way, 1 feed in, 7 out.

    You can hardly see my cable posted here: https://www.overclockers.co.uk/forums/posts/33907536/
     
  11. Avalon

    Soldato

    Joined: 29 Dec 2002

    Posts: 6,411

    Funny, but tragically familiar. Rack Life ain't easy... and that's before you get to the hidden costs, like rails.
     
  12. apachegoose

    Associate

    Joined: 28 Jan 2020

    Posts: 60

    Keep it Simple, its a home not a datacenter.

    Buy a 10" Cab and buy kit that fits that size. Yes it does limit you re switches but it looks a lot better and they actually can suit a home if properly situated. Used to run a 19" 12U rack for all our gear but one of the best things we ever did was replacing it all 10" cab to house the patch panel + 4 switches and has space for more. Takes up a lot less space and they look just like a normal small cabinet. Main issue with 10" is your machines unless you go USFF will have to be housed externally, switches are scarce although Mikrotik do a fair few that can fit including a 24 port one with 2 SFP+ and you will likely have to use shelves as only Zyxel do Rack Ears for 10" gear.

    Of course if terminating it all in a hidden spot is possible (e.g. a walk in cupboard, loft, etc) just go with a 19" rack as you won't care what it looks like then.
     
  13. sepulchre

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 30 Sep 2003

    Posts: 2,054

    Location: Not so Sunny Dundee

    It will be in a cupboard so looks and space aren’t so important

    thanks all for the advice.

    Company coming round to go through the requirements tomorrow. Will consider external routing if it’s possible as I do have a drain pipe I can anchor to but the internal location to drill through to might be inaccessible as I’ve got a shed beside the spot which I’m not about to move.
     
  14. WJA96

    Capodecina

    Joined: 13 Jul 2005

    Posts: 16,918

    Location: Norfolk, South Scotland

    Don’t talk to me about rails! Supermicro charge as much for a rail kit as they do for some of the cheaper MicroServers. It’s outrageous.
     
  15. Avalon

    Soldato

    Joined: 29 Dec 2002

    Posts: 6,411

    I feel your pain, and have the receipts for two sets of yellow label rails from last month to prove it. Rack life is not cheap.
     
  16. KPC

    Associate

    Joined: Wednesday

    Posts: 11

    "cheapest" cable will be Copper Clad Aluminium and can lead to all sorts of headaches (poor terminations, wires breaking due to brittle cores, overheating with PoE). This stuff is everywhere sadly, even some electrical wholesalers are flogging it. If you're buying it yourself make sure it's solid copper and if you're getting someone else to install and supply, specify solid copper and check the box they are using. The last thing you want to be doing is having to replace **** cable tomorrow that's been chased into walls and decorated, because you saved a few quid yesterday.

    https://lynxdatacabling.co.uk/beware-cca-ccc-cables/

    Panels and outlets are much of a muchness but I'd still be wary of no-names ones.

    Comtec, Connectix and Excel all offer good, low-budget cable and connections. You'll often find them surplus/used on ebay.
     
    Last edited: 7 Apr 2021 at 15:17
  17. sepulchre

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 30 Sep 2003

    Posts: 2,054

    Location: Not so Sunny Dundee

    Thanks, that’s really helpful :)
     
  18. robj20

    Capodecina

    Joined: 9 Apr 2007

    Posts: 10,011

    I wouldn't bother with one of those rackmount power strips either. I was planning on having one but just got a 6 way surge protected strip the bonus is it fits at the back of the cabinet behind a shallow Poe switch so takes up no room.
    Only got a 8 port Poe switch, 24 port switch and patch panel so far.
    I like having a gap between each also so you can now easily route the cables. Mines under the stairs right at the back. Next to it is my FTTP connection so it's all nicely tucked away.

    I ran cat6 to every room during decorating, 2 in each bedroom, 2 on the loft, 6 in the living room and 2 in the dining room. Then I have a Poe camera, more cameras, and some Poe WiFi access points to come in the future.
     
  19. sepulchre

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 30 Sep 2003

    Posts: 2,054

    Location: Not so Sunny Dundee

    Yep already scratched that :D
     
  20. WJA96

    Capodecina

    Joined: 13 Jul 2005

    Posts: 16,918

    Location: Norfolk, South Scotland

    A lot of people don’t realise that racks have a front and a back. And the 1U power distribution units (PDU) are designed to mount at the back of the cabinet, not the front. While I’m definitely not a rack neat-freak, I couldn’t have a loose PDU floating about somewhere in my cabinet. And you don’t lose any of your 1U slots. Many folks also miss the fact that some of those PDUs also mount vertically in the cabinet so the cables go straight back and don’t foul the devices above and below.

    Have you given any thought to a UPS? Keeping your network up during a power outage is a great thing.