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I think I killed my 4790K when I delidded it

Discussion in 'Overclocking & Cooling' started by cfrhoar, 17 Feb 2018.

  1. cfrhoar

    Associate

    Joined: 17 Feb 2018

    Posts: 4

    I used the Rockit Cool 88 delid kit and everything went smoothly. I applied thermal grizzly, put the IHS back on with the provided guide tool (I did not re-glue the IHS back on) and then popped it back into my system. The MB turns on but I get post code 'C'. I double checked the EPS power cables and everything was correct.

    I also tried to reset BIOS, took out CMOS batter, tried separate BIOS on the MB, tried 1 stick of RAM... still gives me 'C' for post code.

    The die looks fine as well as the PCB on the CPU. I do not see any bent pins on the MB.

    Here are pictures of the CPU and socket: https://imgur.com/a/bYCIz

    I'm okay(kinda) with loosing out on the CPU but I want to how I ****** up so I can correct it next time. I feel like I have tried everything but I want to make sure I'm not missing something before I upgrade

    MB is a EVGA z97 classified

    TIA for any help or recommendations.
     
  2. scubes

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 28 May 2007

    Posts: 2,136

    Location: Saturn’s moon Titan

    What does the code mean in the motherboard manual?
     
  3. Spudgun

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 18 Oct 2002

    Posts: 1,488

    CPU error is a 'c' code
     
  4. ANDARIAL

    Soldato

    Joined: 19 Oct 2002

    Posts: 6,312

    Location: Woolyback Country

  5. Doogles

    Mobster

    Joined: 22 Mar 2014

    Posts: 3,930

    You've got a hair in the socket, I wonder if you used enough Grizzly as I can see the lower part of the die hasn't got any on it, you can kill them like that if you don't dissipate the heat from the whole die. It looks fine otherwise so I'd get back with the liquid metal and just fill that little bit in and hope that is the problem.
     
  6. benjii

    Mobster

    Joined: 26 Apr 2013

    Posts: 3,786

    Location: Plymouth

    Is that a scratch?

    [​IMG]
     
  7. cfrhoar

    Associate

    Joined: 17 Feb 2018

    Posts: 4

    Thank you for the replies everyone, I did notice the hair in the socket and removed that. The missing liquied metal on the endge of the die was because I was in the process of cleaning the liquied metal and reapplying it so it was not like that when I was testing it in the MB.
    I did notice that, it is not a scratch or liquied metal (im honestly not sure what it is because it took quite a while of rubbing it with a mircofiber cloth and isopropyl alcohol to get it removed.). I cleaned it off and retested but still no dice.

    Thanks again everyone, I’ve went ahead and upgraded to the 8700k and will NOT be attempting a delid . I will also be testing the PSU soon just in case moving it out of the case caused it to break .
     
  8. cfrhoar

    Associate

    Joined: 17 Feb 2018

    Posts: 4

    and the best guess to what happened would be whatever that stuff was by the little capacitors was conductive and cause a short on the traces of the pcb?
     
  9. Jumper118

    Mobster

    Joined: 17 Oct 2012

    Posts: 4,909

    Location: Leeds

    Did you put anything over the smd's like nail polish?
     
  10. cfrhoar

    Associate

    Joined: 17 Feb 2018

    Posts: 4

    I did not
     
  11. Jumper118

    Mobster

    Joined: 17 Oct 2012

    Posts: 4,909

    Location: Leeds

    Its a good idea to do that. It prevents any liquid metal getting on them and shorting them out
     
  12. Andygully

    Hitman

    Joined: 18 Apr 2013

    Posts: 810

    Location: Liverpool

    Lesson learned i never knew to do this myself.
     
  13. Jumper118

    Mobster

    Joined: 17 Oct 2012

    Posts: 4,909

    Location: Leeds

    Gamers nexus did a great guide.
     
  14. benjii

    Mobster

    Joined: 26 Apr 2013

    Posts: 3,786

    Location: Plymouth

    Nail varnish is not the best idea, the quality and ingredients can vary wildly. It would be better to use Kapton tape or the like. Kapton tape is designed specially for use with electrical components and is heat resistant beyond the temperatures you'll find in a PC.
     
  15. FishD

    Associate

    Joined: 20 Feb 2018

    Posts: 2

    I used high temp gasket silicon (sensor safe), and put a little dab of that on the SMD's, and allowed to set before glueing the lid back with the silicon.