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Investing into Shares

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by panthro, 18 Jun 2006.

  1. panthro

    Capodecina

    Joined: 19 Nov 2004

    Posts: 11,906

    Location: Wokingham

    Im looking into investing some money in shares. I have about £200 that I would like to begin with. I havent looked into this fully yet, but have been reading a few websites like Motley Fool. Am I right in that you must go through a broker such as TD Waterhouse? Is £200 enough to start with, or do some brokers require a certain amount to begin trading?
    How many of you on here own shares? Any tips? Cheers!
     
  2. gam3r

    Mobster

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    Location: London..

  3. Chunky

    Hitman

    Joined: 26 Oct 2005

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    About £1,000 is what you really need to start with.
     
  4. Tomsk

    Soldato

    Joined: 18 Oct 2002

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    Location: Overground, underground..

    Ditto.

    Your dealing charges when you buy AND sell will eat into any profits. Charges will be typically £5 or more.
     
  5. Stephen7372

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  6. panthro

    Capodecina

    Joined: 19 Nov 2004

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    Location: Wokingham

    I have £1000 so this is not a problem, but I thought that this would be too much to begin with.
     
  7. Haircut

    Mobster

    Joined: 18 Oct 2002

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    Location: SW London

    Buy a unit trust to start with if you're not all that sure of what you're doing.
    Less likely to make massive gains but a lot less risky though.
     
  8. Stephen7372

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  9. quadboi

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  10. ninja economist

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    Joined: 25 Feb 2006

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    Location: UK

    http://www.internaxx.lu/

    Very few brokers charge high-rates of commission anymore (As outlined earlier as 5GBP, when was the last time you traded? The 80s?). Regardless of how many shares you buy or sell or even short internaxx and most other dealers will charge a few pence, as long as you do it over the internet yourself. No stamp duty that way either.

    200 GBP is not alot to start out with however, and realistically you should start in around the 800 GBP range. Also, I would suggest you read up on it and do your own trading rather than trust some schmuck with your money. They see someone with little money to invest they'll dump one of their expenses into your pocket, whether it be rubbish stock or otc options.

    Now's not a great time to get into the markets with all this volatility, small time investors usually get their knees broke in times like this, so I'd say just watch it for a while before you do anything. Channels like Bloomberg or CNBC will keep you sort of up to date with developments, so they're your best bet.
     
    Last edited: 18 Jun 2006
  11. quadboi

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    Ninja knows what hes talkiong about, at the moment its a bear market i believe..
     
  12. ninja economist

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    It seems that way on most fronts. I guess we'll just have to wait and see, hard to tell with all the Federal Reserve speculation on rate hikes recently. Hopefully as things are made clearer soon we might see a rebound.
     
  13. Tomsk

    Soldato

    Joined: 18 Oct 2002

    Posts: 5,225

    Location: Overground, underground..

    I must be missing something then. :confused:

    internaxx have trading rates of €28 for deals of <€5000

    a search on moneysupermarket find £7 per deal
     
  14. ninja economist

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    I believe that's for them to do it for you across the phone (due to the call centre bit at the bottom). Doing it yourself through their software cuts out the need for a buyer to purchase on your behalf, as it's mainly all electronic nowadays. I think their rates for online trading through software is around 0.5 per cent for all actions under 15,000 E.

    They do manage to get money back out of you by charging account fees of around 60-80 GBP per year, and commission on foreign trades are quite high. If you shop around though, companies like sharewatch charge 0.3 or 0.2 per cent for all deals under 25,000 E
     
  15. bottletop

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 26 Feb 2003

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