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Phd, DPhil, DPsyche, MPhil, MSc, MA - whats the difference?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by cleanbluesky, 27 Mar 2006.

  1. cleanbluesky

    Capodecina

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    Can anyone tell me the practical differences between various HE qualifications... specifically between Phd and other doctoral qualifications?
     
  2. Phog

    Mobster

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    I thought it was more specific to your subject at Doctorate level.

    AFAIK, there's very little practical difference.
     
  3. Nix

    Capodecina

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    PhD = Doctor of Philosophy.

    I'm taking a stab in the dark here but I assume a DPhil and PhD are one in the same.

    An MSc or MA is a Masters in Science or Art. They're higher than a degree but lower than a PhD. They usually take up to one year of full time higher education to complete whereas a PhD can take anything around four years.

    An MPhil is a Masters in Philosophy.
     
  4. Berserker

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    D = Docrotate

    DPhil = Doctorate of Philosphy. Ph.D covers all doctorate level qualifications, but I'm not sure if that makes them one and the same.

    M = Masters

    MPhil = Master of Philosphy (I think).
    MSc = Master of Science
    MA = Master of the Arts

    B = Bachelor (University Degree level)

    BSc = Bachelor of Science
    BA = Bachelor of the Arts

    I've never seen a BPhil, but can't rule it entirely nonsensical. :)
     
  5. Borris

    Caporegime

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    PhD = Philosophiae Doctor = DPhil = Doctor of Philosophy

    DH MD = Doogie Howser, MD.
     
  6. cleanbluesky

    Capodecina

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    Cheers guys, now how are they different and who regulates them?
     
  7. Nix

    Capodecina

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    D > M > B

    I think it's all regulated by the universities themselves.
     
  8. Borris

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    I would imagine that they are regulated by the institutions that award them.
     
  9. Berserker

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    I'd imagine the history traces back to Oxford or Cambridge, as most things University-related seem to do.
     
  10. cleanbluesky

    Capodecina

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    More than one organisation offers a Phd in a given subject, the courses must be regulated.

    I know that the British Psychological Society part regulates a course I am looking at, although that may just be for the sake of 'accreditation' (BPS accreditation seems quite rare amongst vendors of this course) but the doctorate must be regulated by someone else
     
  11. Berserker

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  12. cleanbluesky

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  13. Basher

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  14. Borris

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  15. billabong

    Gangster

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    Right Phd's, MPhil's and Masters by Research (which is defined as MSc too not to be confused with a standard Masters degree even though some are listed as MSc also) tend to referred to as Research Degrees.

    PhD, in essence is a major piece of research work focussing on a particular area within a specific field. Maybe the OCUK PhD'ers will correct me on this, ones research has to provide a new outlook / development within the subject field. Examination tends to be a dissertation, with a viva at the end too. Duration wise, probably a min. of 3 yrs.

    MPhil's tend to be awarded to those that have partially completed their PhD. Some academics view it as a failed Phd. Who knows.

    Masters by Research tend to be more practical based (1 yr f/t or 2 yrs p/t). and is for anyone who wants to conduct an extended research project in a specific area.

    This is what I understand it all to mean. I work at a uni, not an academic though, its just I've had to sit through various meetings where this has been discussed. Sure I have missed something, haven't always managed to stay awake.
     
  16. Berserker

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    Sure, Wikipedia has more than a few 'senior moments'. I find it is generally pretty good with the science and technology stuff (obvious blunders and silly inconsistencies between similar topics aside), but tends to break badly when getting into historical or biographical arenas. That's a discussion for another thread. :)


    PS - Spelling/Grammar Nazis will get their comeuppance - I used an Americanism, complete with American spelling. :p
     
  17. WJA96

    Capodecina

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    Don't forget the DSc which is awarded after a researcher has published a phenomenal amount and generally is worthy of a better qualification than a PhD.
     
  18. Visage

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    As a footnote, be wary of Oxford MA's.......they're often granted with no extra work....
     
  19. Basher

    Sgarrista

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    Same with cambridge, as long as you don't get divorced or get a criminal record.
     
  20. Visage

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    Degrees from 'East Anglia Poly' are useless anyway......