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Possible to change phone line to a network point?

Discussion in 'Networks & Internet Connectivity' started by volt9291, 9 Jun 2019.

  1. volt9291

    Hitman

    Joined: 2 Feb 2006

    Posts: 616

    ok, so I have fiber to the home which comes into my understairs cupboard to the ONT. Below the ONT is a phone socket which you connect the phone cable from the ONT to provide a phone line to two different points, one in the hallway and one into our living room, which we currently have our phone base station plugged into.

    To me, the cable that is behind the face plates looks like its Cat 5...

    I want to know if I can change the living room and understairs point to a network point?
    Then the understairs point would have a patch cable to my router, then I could fit a small switch to the living room point, allowing me to have my TV & PS4, etc. hardwired.

    It looks like one single cable runs to the hallway and then the living room connects behind the hallway socket.

    Hopefully, these pictures help?

    Living room point
    [​IMG]

    Living room wires
    [​IMG]

    ONT (router sits above this)
    [​IMG]

    Phone socket below ONT
    [​IMG]

    Hallway point. Two cables, one from the ONT point and the other running into the living room
    [​IMG]
     
  2. bremen1874

    Capodecina

    Joined: 20 Oct 2008

    Posts: 11,906

    It does look like network cable so what you describe should work.

    Re-twist the pairs together before terminating the cables. Ideally, you should trim them right back, but that could leave you with problems re-terminating in the future.

    You'd need to join the cable in the hallway. Something like this

    https://cpc.farnell.com/pro-signal/...8fSBalgsUOQiz3xQKi0pt_zVStWioVCri0aAu2O8P8HAQ

    might fit in the backing box with a blanking cover over it.

    You'll need to find another option for connecting your landline phone.
     
  3. volt9291

    Hitman

    Joined: 2 Feb 2006

    Posts: 616

    That's great thanks. I will have to try it... If that doesn't fit what other options do I have for joining the cable?

    I think I will just move the phone base station to plug in directly in the understairs cupboard.
     
  4. bremen1874

    Capodecina

    Joined: 20 Oct 2008

    Posts: 11,906

    A backing box is 75mm square and I'm pretty sure those couplers aren't that long.

    If it's going to behind a blanking plate it won't need its top on which will make the cable access easier.
     
  5. Quartz

    Capodecina

    Joined: 1 Apr 2014

    Posts: 13,602

    Location: Aberdeen

    Certainly looks like ethernet, but whether or not it is Cat 5 is another matter. Are you able to pull the cable through? If so, replace it with known cat 6 ethernet cable. You may need to do this in two stages: first attach a pull wire to the current cable and pull that through, then use the pull wire to pull the new cable through. The advantage of that way is you don't run the risk of the two cables separating somewhere in the duct.
     
  6. bremen1874

    Capodecina

    Joined: 20 Oct 2008

    Posts: 11,906

    If it's not at least Cat5 what's is going to be? Cat5 and/or Cat5e have been the minimum level for as long as I can remember (and I can remember installing 10Base2).

    No point even trying to replace the cable until it has proved not to work (IMO).
     
  7. volt9291

    Hitman

    Joined: 2 Feb 2006

    Posts: 616

    I haven't a clue what route it takes or how it's been fixed, I'm guessing it will go: up from the living room - across the ceiling - down into the hall - the hall then runs up to the ceiling - towards the cupboard - drops down into cupboard.

    can't see me being able to pull that, or is it normal to pull routes like that?

    I did give a little pull earlier just to see if the cable had anything printed on it to say if it was Cat 5 or not, didn't move, but then didn't want to pull too hard and break it.
     
  8. bremen1874

    Capodecina

    Joined: 20 Oct 2008

    Posts: 11,906

    Most of the time you aren't going to be able to re-pull cables unless they had that in mind when they went in (ducting/conduit).
     
  9. volt9291

    Hitman

    Joined: 2 Feb 2006

    Posts: 616

    yeah, which this wouldn't have. its a new build (well nearly 6 years old) I'm guessing it would be fixed along the route or 90 degree turns it won't pull through.
     
  10. bremen1874

    Capodecina

    Joined: 20 Oct 2008

    Posts: 11,906

    Most likely clipped to the wall before the plasterboard went up.
     
  11. Quartz

    Capodecina

    Joined: 1 Apr 2014

    Posts: 13,602

    Location: Aberdeen

    Precisely.

    Noob. :)

    I prefer a pre-emptive strike when I have the opportunity.

    If the cable is in ducting pulling it through shouldn't be a problem; if it's been clamped along the way that's not going to be possible.
     
  12. bremen1874

    Capodecina

    Joined: 20 Oct 2008

    Posts: 11,906

    Can you honestly see the electrician (and it is was most likely an electrician) installing ducting for the telephone wiring?
     
  13. volt9291

    Hitman

    Joined: 2 Feb 2006

    Posts: 616

    yeah, don't think pulling a new run will work.

    I will see if joining it and putting two RJ45 face plates work, worth it for only spending £10 or so. if not will stick with wifi, just thinking it would be a nice to have if it worked.
     
  14. Quartz

    Capodecina

    Joined: 1 Apr 2014

    Posts: 13,602

    Location: Aberdeen

    Apparently it's a new build so they should.
     
  15. bremen1874

    Capodecina

    Joined: 20 Oct 2008

    Posts: 11,906

    Why would they need to use ducting for internal telephone extension wiring? Honest question, if it's a requirement it'd be interesting to know.

    How old can a house be and still count as 'new build'? The OP's is one is six years old which is pushing it in my mind.
     
  16. Quartz

    Capodecina

    Joined: 1 Apr 2014

    Posts: 13,602

    Location: Aberdeen

    It's common sense. They were ducting cables in the 80s, if not before. The question is moot anyway, as the OP has tried to pull and found he can't.
     
  17. volt9291

    Hitman

    Joined: 2 Feb 2006

    Posts: 616

    My mention of it being a new build was more to the fact of how it was probably made rather than its actual age. The wiring was probably done by someone that is rushed that has to wire 'X' amount of houses that day. It is probably not the best of jobs. I am sure most new housing estates (built in the last 10/15 years) have the same standards.
     
  18. Caged

    Capodecina

    Joined: 18 Oct 2002

    Posts: 24,331

    All internal cabling on every new build I've seen is just tacked to timber framing or capped where it's a brick wall. Nothing is laid in conduit and I can't see anything in the regs that suggests data/telecom is meant to be either.

    Is that a Seethelight FTTP install or similar? It looks like a Friday afternoon job.
     
  19. volt9291

    Hitman

    Joined: 2 Feb 2006

    Posts: 616

    Ha yeah, it is Seethelight! but they only installed the ONT. The cable was run by the builders, and yes I think the same, most probably tacked to timber.

    Seethelight as an ISP has been excellent though, always maximum speed and very low ping, can't fault them!
     
  20. volt9291

    Hitman

    Joined: 2 Feb 2006

    Posts: 616

    Update: Had my cousin come around today to do the first fix for the electrics (I'm moving where the TV is mounted), he also joined the Cat 5 cable- it works perfectly! getting full speed, low ping. no issues whatsoever! :D chuffed.