1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Retaining garden wall collapse

Discussion in 'Home and Garden' started by Rob43, 8 Jan 2021.

  1. Rob43

    Mobster

    Joined: 17 Jun 2003

    Posts: 3,091

    Location: Scotland

    Thanks for the info. There was no visible damage on my side, there are no exposed roots that I can see either.

    Rob
     
  2. Syla5

    Soldato

    Joined: 13 Feb 2012

    Posts: 5,199

    So this sounds like its the rear of your garden, not the side join between you and your neighbour?? What is on the other side of the wall that potentially has caused only your 30ft to collapse? is yours the only section with a tree near it for example?
     
  3. Rob43

    Mobster

    Joined: 17 Jun 2003

    Posts: 3,091

    Location: Scotland

    Yes, it's at the bottom of the garden. It's a boundary wall. Had my deeds checked via my solicitors. It's not just 30ft at my garden, it's collapsed next doors as well,around 10ft where the ivy is at its thickest. The other side of the wall is covered in ivy. There's so much of it, it's nearly completely covered a shed over the wall too. I been removing it from my side for the last few years. It grows over the wall & up my tree as well.

    Thanks for all the info folks, been very helpful

    Rob
     
    Last edited: 13 Jan 2021
  4. Syla5

    Soldato

    Joined: 13 Feb 2012

    Posts: 5,199

    who owns the land on the other side of the wall? Sure its a boundary wall but it sounds like its not the boundary between you and your neighbour, but the boundary at the back extent of both your properties?
     
  5. Rob43

    Mobster

    Joined: 17 Jun 2003

    Posts: 3,091

    Location: Scotland

    That, I'm not sure. I'm speaking to the neighbours about it, just waiting for them to get back to me.
     
  6. Syla5

    Soldato

    Joined: 13 Feb 2012

    Posts: 5,199

    Maybe its worth finding out if the wall is your responsibility then or that of the land owner on the other side? The wall isn't between you and the neighbour so doesn't seem like you would be responsible for his section as cant see how your wall is retaining your garden from his, if it doesn't border between your two properties but runs along the back of both??
     
  7. j.col

    Mobster

    Joined: 31 May 2010

    Posts: 4,162

    Location: Bedfordshire

    Was i imagining it or did you say that the neighbours side of the wall was overgrown with ivy?
    If so the ivy would have caused the collapse, as it would have grown through the wall and weakened the joints between the bricks.
    So therfore in my opinion the neighbour caused the collapse by not removing or managing the ivy, so its down to him to repair the wall due to his negligence
     
  8. Syla5

    Soldato

    Joined: 13 Feb 2012

    Posts: 5,199

    It sounds like the ivy is on the side of the wall that is not facing in to either the OP or the OP's neighbours garden. The confusion here is its being made to sound like the wall is between the OP and his neighbour, when infact the wall seems to be at the end of both the OP and the OP's neighbours and in fact runs the length of the street across the back of everyones garden.
     
  9. NoobCannon

    Soldato

    Joined: 13 Jun 2011

    Posts: 5,396

    How has this made it to 3 pages without a picture