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Road Cycling Essentials

Discussion in 'SA Archive' started by Matutu, 28 Jun 2010.

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  1. Matutu

    Hitman

    Joined: 21 Aug 2008

    Posts: 838

    Hey Guys,

    As some of you might know from my other thread ive just ended up buying a road cycle, and ive moved from a Hybrid to this which i think is abit more speicialised:

    [​IMG]

    Now im wondering what people consider the essential pieces of kits i should be carrying or waring etc.

    At the moment the only thing i carry is a multi-tool for changing seat etc etc, a helmet, a water bottle and thats it lol.

    Does anyone else have some recommendations of what else i should be buying?

    Thanks alot.
     
  2. touch

    Capodecina

    Joined: 28 Oct 2006

    Posts: 11,920

    Location: Sufferlandria

    get yourself a small pump, spare tubes and tyre levers and maybe a saddle bag to keep it all in.
    I like to wear glasses when cycling to keep flies, mud and rain out of my eyes. I got a good, cheap pair in an industrial supplies shop.
    Also, if you havnt already, get some padded shorts.

    edit: i meant keep the tubes + tyre levers in the saddle bag - obviously a pump wont fit :p
     
  3. Shmo

    Hitman

    Joined: 9 Jan 2005

    Posts: 716

    Location: High Wycombe :/

    Be prepared to change those tyres as they probably have the durability of packing foam. I bought a Giant about 4 years ago that came with some cheap Kenda tyres and they were terrible for handling in the wet and constantly getting punctures.
     
  4. touch

    Capodecina

    Joined: 28 Oct 2006

    Posts: 11,920

    Location: Sufferlandria

    Oh, also, i would think about clipless pedals.
    If your using the bike for commuting to work, then you'll probably want to keep the flat pedals so you can cycle it in your work shoes.
    If your going to be using the bike for just riding around, clipless pedals will give you more power. Takes a bit of getting used to tho. Maybe wait a month or two until you're a bit more confident on the bike if you dont like the idea at first.
     
  5. [DOD]Asprilla

    Capodecina

    Joined: 10 Nov 2003

    Posts: 14,034

    Location: Surrey, by the river

    What touch said, plus padded mitts.

    You'll need to get some more stuff for autumn / winter. I'd also get some proper cycling jerseys, it's a lot easier to use pockets on the back and they work as good motivation to stay in shape.
     
  6. platypus

    Caporegime

    Joined: 25 Jul 2003

    Posts: 39,123

    Location: Rhône-Alpes+Cambridge

    Nice purchase, looks snappy :).

    As above really. A good saddle, good shorts, a saddle bag kit (tyre levers, multi-tool, puncture repair kit, spare inner tubes), some good gloves, a small pump to fit to the drinks cage bolts are essential on bike bits. Obviously you need a helmet, and the more lycra you can get the better :p.
     
  7. Matutu

    Hitman

    Joined: 21 Aug 2008

    Posts: 838

    Hmmmm Lycra don't think so I'm a skinny 9.5 stone guy that's not a good look lol.

    That's for the help guys looks like I need a lot, can anyone recommend me a replacement tube that would fit my bike that is decent? As theres hundreds :s
     
  8. Jonny ///M

    Capodecina

    Joined: 23 Nov 2004

    Posts: 10,394

    I tend to carry some sram spare links for the chain and a chain toon if the chain was to snap.

    Apart from that everything has been mentioned a and a saddle bag to keep it all in.
     
  9. [DOD]Asprilla

    Capodecina

    Joined: 10 Nov 2003

    Posts: 14,034

    Location: Surrey, by the river

    Lycra makes a difference.

    Yes, we wear it because we are tarts, but it is also very comfortable over long distances (less chance or rubbing and saddle soreness) and it's also aerodynamically more efficient; wearing lycra is more effective than such things as aeroframes or deep rim wheels so you can go faster.

    If you are going to be a road cyclist then you are going to start playing 'the game' because everyone does. because of this you will soon want to go as quick as you can all the time.

    BTW, how heavy do you think pro cyclists are? The lighter you are the easier it is to climb hills. Going up Box Hill I wish I was 10kg lighter.
     
  10. touch

    Capodecina

    Joined: 28 Oct 2006

    Posts: 11,920

    Location: Sufferlandria

    Haha, dont worry. I dont think lycra is a good look for anyone?
    We dont wear if to look good though, we wear it because it's comfortable and aerodynamic.
     
  11. craptakular

    Capodecina

    Joined: 7 Jan 2007

    Posts: 10,615

    Location: Sussex, UK

    bike.
     
  12. Andelusion

    Capodecina

    Joined: 1 Oct 2003

    Posts: 14,339

    Location: Huddersfield

    Some wet wipes, or tissues, anything!

    The first time you ride through some crap you'll thank me.
     
  13. SkodaMart

    Mobster

    Joined: 27 Jul 2009

    Posts: 4,163

    Location: Manchester

    Spoke key (learn to use it! You may need it with lightweight wheels)
    Kevlar tyres are also great for almost zero punctures.
    I also carry a card with contact details (a bit morbid I suppose) but you never know.
     
  14. Andelusion

    Capodecina

    Joined: 1 Oct 2003

    Posts: 14,339

    Location: Huddersfield

    If you make a habit of going on long journeys then it could be an idea to take a replacement gear cable, brake pads, spare chain links, and some spares for more flimsy screws on the bike. These things hardly weigh a lot, you should have them at home, so you may as well take them with you.
     
  15. [DOD]Asprilla

    Capodecina

    Joined: 10 Nov 2003

    Posts: 14,034

    Location: Surrey, by the river

    Oh, zip ties. Couple of thes and you can temporarily jerry-rig most things.
     
  16. Matutu

    Hitman

    Joined: 21 Aug 2008

    Posts: 838

    Sorry to be a pain guys but im getting confused with this. I take it our road bikes have inner tubes with tyres over the top correct?

    So in a case of a puncture the the external tyre can survive the ride home if you replace the tube?, but if you replace the tyre in the first instance with a Kevlar type the chances of a puncture decrease?

    I believe the size of my tyres are 700 x 25mm? Can anyone recommend a good Kevlar Tyre as i would prefer to do this now if it avoid/lowers the chances of punctures.

    Thanks guys.
     
  17. oddjob62

    Sgarrista

    Joined: 8 Nov 2002

    Posts: 9,128

    Location: NW London

    A proper track/floor pump is a good investment, although not essential. Makes keeping the tyres at full pressure much easier than any portable pump.
     
  18. oddjob62

    Sgarrista

    Joined: 8 Nov 2002

    Posts: 9,128

    Location: NW London

    Yes that's right.

    I changed to Continental Grand Prix 4 Seasons a couple of months ago after being plagued with punctures. Touch wood, not had one since, although i have lost an inner since when my rim exploded (no fault of tyre)

    EDIT: I would also practice changing an inner if you've never done it before. You do not want your first time to be in the dark in the pouring rain in a dodgy part of town (Sod's law).
     
    Last edited: 29 Jun 2010
  19. Shoei

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 11 Dec 2003

    Posts: 2,452

    Location: Heysham, Lancs

    I ran Vrederstien tyres for over 1000 miles with no punctures or problems. They were 23c, so possible a bit harsh for most, but couldnt fault them at all. In the dry or as per usual round here, the pouring rain/standing water performed brilliantly.

    Echo what most are saying, seat pack with spare tube, multitool, latex gloves, tyre levers, money.
    Learn to love Lycra and the snugness next to your skin, they way it helps you speed along ;)
     
  20. platypus

    Caporegime

    Joined: 25 Jul 2003

    Posts: 39,123

    Location: Rhône-Alpes+Cambridge

    Different things for everyone really. I run Michelin Pro 3s with Specialized inner tubes, and they are truly excellent for me.
     
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