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Road Cycling

Discussion in 'Pedal Powered' started by FrenchTart, 29 Jun 2016.

  1. BennyC

    Capodecina

    Joined: 25 Sep 2006

    Posts: 13,946

    Yep, could get away with a few. A straighter chain-line is more efficient too :cool:
     
  2. uv

    Sgarrista

    Joined: 16 May 2006

    Posts: 8,435

    Location: Manchester

    chain links - isn't it just big-big, pull it taught, then add two links?

    Also, I'm itching to get some oversize jockey wheels after seeing Chavanel's during the tour today!
     
  3. Feek

    Commissario

    Joined: 16 Oct 2002

    Posts: 231,379

    Location: In the radio shack

    Hopefully some of you will remember my efforts over the past couple of years - I'm very much a fair weather cyclist who won't even consider going out if there's inclement weather forecast.

    I generally ride for a couple of months a year over the summer and that's it. I've been doing that for the last few weeks and this morning I did my longest ride so far and reached my highest average speed.

    I know it's nothing compared to you 'proper' road cyclists but I did just over 25 miles at a tad over 14 mph average which I'm more than happy with considering I'm riding a hybrid (Voodoo Marasa). The Strava link is here.

    Generally I've been riding up and down the esplanade/sea front but today I made a point of riding all the way along the road which was much nicer. The esplanade is a combined cycleway/footpath so it's quite legit for me to ride there but I'm always very cautious around people, slowing down to pass etc so it was a very welcome change to be on the road without kamikaze pedestrians.

    I enjoyed it.
     
  4. Fusion

    Capodecina

    Joined: 18 Oct 2002

    Posts: 10,574

    Location: Notts

    All good stuff. Progression is great. Don't worry about what others may be clocking :)
     
  5. UTmaniac

    Soldato

    Joined: 9 Nov 2005

    Posts: 6,213

    Location: Southampton

    In this crazy heat, I've rarely averaged much faster than that myself on either bike, more power equals more heat generated... Which boldly goes nowhere in this heatwave, which typically means water consumption rate is much higher!

    You will reach a point where miles just fly by, you upload your ride to Strava and wonder "how the heck was that ride [x] miles?!"
     
  6. Fusion

    Capodecina

    Joined: 18 Oct 2002

    Posts: 10,574

    Location: Notts

    Must admit, even a lad from the coalfields was feeling the warmth today.
     
  7. randomshenans

    Capodecina

    Joined: 11 Sep 2009

    Posts: 12,323

    Location: France, Alsace

    @SoliD I got a pic of mine for you:

    [​IMG]

    Excuse the dirt! :p
     
  8. SoliD

    Capodecina

    Joined: 25 Feb 2004

    Posts: 15,548

    Location: Portsmouth

    Thanks, I took out a couple more links after my TT on Saturday, so will see how that goes.
     
  9. Thomas. PLease.

    Soldato

    Joined: 5 Jul 2007

    Posts: 5,352

    Location: London

    Probably doesn't help that your B tension is miles off.
     
  10. touch

    Capodecina

    Joined: 28 Oct 2006

    Posts: 11,892

    Location: Sufferlandria

    I agree with Thomas. Chain length has no effect on tension. It's the derailleur which provides tension.
     
  11. Feek

    Commissario

    Joined: 16 Oct 2002

    Posts: 231,379

    Location: In the radio shack

    I got a 6th on a Strava segment today out of 1,614 attempts by 634 People. OK, it's only half a mile long along the esplanade and I had a tail wind but that's not bad for an old boy on a hybrid :)
     
  12. BennyC

    Capodecina

    Joined: 25 Sep 2006

    Posts: 13,946

    Yes but no :p

    Power = speed (generally ;) ) which equals higher airflow thus more cooling. /trollface

    Water consumption in the current heat is ridiculous but other than being a bit uncomfortable keeping moving has been key. And I sweat. A lot.
     
  13. Shamrock

    Soldato

    Joined: 24 Jul 2003

    Posts: 5,661

    Location: floating down the Liffey

    You could have been KOM if you had a road bike with drop bars!:p
     
  14. Armageus

    Don

    Joined: 19 May 2012

    Posts: 12,148

    Location: Spalding, Lincolnshire

    So all my parts arrived today.

    Removed old chain with link removal tool no issue.
    Got the cassette changed relatively easily despite poor freewheel remover and chain whip.

    However, now temporarily stumped as can't undo one of the crank arm bolts. Am using a 14mm socket on a 3/8" ratchet, turning anti clockwise, but the drive side one just won't move (and unfortunately my fingers did... straight onto the chainring eek).

    Have soaked with wd40, and will give another go tomorrow. Other than more leverage (breaker bar, and maybe a bit of pipe over the crank arm if I can get them) and manning the **** up, is there anything else I can try?

    Edit:
    Got some big cable ties I might try to secure the crank arm to the frame.
     
    Last edited: 9 Jul 2018
  15. Saytan

    Mobster

    Joined: 18 Oct 2002

    Posts: 4,563


    once upon a time I ended up using two 6-foot lengths of scaffold bar, one over the socket wrench and one over the crank.....
     
  16. Jonny ///M

    Capodecina

    Joined: 23 Nov 2004

    Posts: 10,365

    I use a box of catalogues in work.

    Left hand pedal flat against it horizontally so any force down on the bolt will make the left hand crank want to go somewhere it cant and it keeps the bike on the ground too.
     
  17. Saytan

    Mobster

    Joined: 18 Oct 2002

    Posts: 4,563


    Mother earth, the ultimate lever.
     
  18. Armageus

    Don

    Joined: 19 May 2012

    Posts: 12,148

    Location: Spalding, Lincolnshire

    Thanks for tips - colleague at work has some scaffold pole that he is going to bring round tomorrow so will give that a go (and gives a day for the WD40 to try and penetrate, and my hands to recover slightly!).

    To avoid the new ones seizing, what should I be using? Copper or Lithium grease? Anti-seize or something else?
     
  19. Saytan

    Mobster

    Joined: 18 Oct 2002

    Posts: 4,563

    I use a dab of copper on threads, lithium is for bearings really, but it's better than nothing in a pinch.

    WD40 is rubbish as a penetrant, better than nothing, but not even on the same page as plus gas.
     
  20. SoliD

    Capodecina

    Joined: 25 Feb 2004

    Posts: 15,548

    Location: Portsmouth