1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Road Cycling

Discussion in 'Pedal Powered' started by FrenchTart, 29 Jun 2016.

  1. Fusion

    Capodecina

    Joined: 18 Oct 2002

    Posts: 10,574

    Location: Notts

    But I doubt you train for 20+ hours a week (or whatever), and you probably hold down a full time job. Average speed of ~20mph isn’t to be sniffed at, even if you were at 150bpm. Almost everyone is going to come up short when compared with elite athletes!

    Would be great to have the opportunity to train full time to see what was possible.
     
  2. Jonny ///M

    Capodecina

    Joined: 23 Nov 2004

    Posts: 10,365

    If only we could all go full time!

    Just riding your bike more helps a lot.

    I used to do about 1500-1900 miles per year including commuting.

    Last year I was at 4500 miles and felt better for it, already at 3500 mikes for this year so hope to be closer to 5500 miles come winter.
     
  3. tedmaul

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 16 Mar 2004

    Posts: 1,451

    Location: of stuff i say ---->

    Ah right, cool. Aye, bit of a shame after the great weather we've had, but still it's been some summer so far. Glad to see you're kicking *** though.

    Yeah, that time i could ride ok a couple of years ago I actually did less organised intervals and stuff. I just did a lot more commuting and then made sure all the group rides i was doing were hard ones - bundy/fast douglas bunch/southside/the odd TT etc.

    And i can confirm the opposite is also true. I've done about 200 miles total this year and i can barely cycle out of my street these days before i need to sit up and have a wee break. :o
     
  4. Roady

    Sgarrista

    Joined: 18 Oct 2002

    Posts: 8,058

    Location: Hereford

    Well done, see if they do some faster 'newbie' kinda rides, if you want to get into club riding? I'd highly recommend it! :)

    Ha, not talking about peak power but probably 'sprint' power, which on Zwift is probably more accurately 10s or 15s at the end of a wind up into a race finish. I probably top out at 800/900W but that would be after the 20-30s sustained power (400-500W). I can kick at around the same 1700/1800W (and have even seen 2000W) but it's not something I can peak at through sustained power.

    Wow that's a lethal combination! Her mobility will only get better but she has to rest to get there - convincing them to rest is one of the hardest things! We've had one of those mornings this morning - both knackered (little ones first 'full' week at nursery - tues, weds, thurs), so much to do in the evenings we're not getting to bed until 10.30/11pm and then she's waking up at 5.30 for some reason when she/we could sleep until 6am. This morning peaked at everyone about ready, then the baby falls over the dog, dust him off and then the dog makes a mad dash for the garden (cat on wall) and treads on the baby = cue the world ending, again. Around 6 hours sleep I could normally deal with, but the extra strain of nursery duties has taken it's toll this week! Still no nursery tomorrow so much easier. Coming in to work shouldn't really feel like the 'easy' bit of the day should it?! :rolleyes:

    That's an insane amount of weight! I'm just thankful our commute is relatively flat but think it will only be a matter of time until I convince her we need a Weehoo iGo. :cool:
     
  5. Roady

    Sgarrista

    Joined: 18 Oct 2002

    Posts: 8,058

    Location: Hereford

    Not disputing that, at the end of the day the big peaks (kicks) I've generally seen on Zwift are NOT in the ride data uploaded/sync to Strava - there's obviously some smoothing in place!

    Not big sprinters but here's a couple of finishes from Jon Mould: 600W over a minute, with a build, ease and then sustained 1000W. 500W over 1min 20s, a surge, then 3 kicks of 1000W. He's very much a crit kinda finisher. Someone like Harry Tanfield is more sustained power: 430W over 2.5 mins with 2* 1000W kicks (after spending 80k in the break, then a 2up final). 500W over 1 min with 4 surges/kicks of 1000-1300W. TDY Stage 1 win, 1.5 min at 470W with 1200W finish. They're not huge numbers, equally they're not huge bunch sprints of stage races. Most of them are more crit/circuit based races where they'll be contesting the finish from a small-ish select group.

    I've chosen those two (rather than some of the dedicated sprinters I have) because they generally have data fields not stripped from their rides.

    Haha, at the end of the day it's only data - something to measure and compare, no matter how inaccurate the measurements or how unpractical measuring different riders with different setups and different measurement tools (trainers/PWMs) is. ;)

    Yup, really sounds like Strava have started to overstep themselves trying to fleece money from the device vendor side as well as the user side. Greedy bastids! ;) :rolleyes:

    Chariot commuting for this week is complete, riding solo today so able to stretch and spin the legs out. Feels better but I'm far more fatigued than I thought I would be... Combination of lack of riding recently along with the increase of chariot weight. Really need to get myself on Zwift or out this weekend, as with the other half back at work she's now working 3 in 4 saturday mornings so me getting out on group rides is going to get scarce again. Bummer! Not that I was able to get out much before! :(
     
  6. UTmaniac

    Soldato

    Joined: 9 Nov 2005

    Posts: 6,212

    Location: Southampton

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b08wn708

    Cav on sprinting (looks like it's old interview with come newer bits edited in).

    He talks of him typically hitting ~1400W in the sprint finishes for ~230 metres, other sprinters hitting ~1900W but not being able to sustain that power. Plus his cadence in those sprints being higher than many others, at over 130rpm.
     
  7. Drollic

    Mobster

    Joined: 24 Feb 2013

    Posts: 3,710

    Location: East Midlands

    Over 130rpm sounds almost too high. Feels silly to me above about 120. Clearly doing it wrong :(
     
  8. Roady

    Sgarrista

    Joined: 18 Oct 2002

    Posts: 8,058

    Location: Hereford

    All relative and relate to pedal efficiency. Many track and BMX riders supposedly do 'no-chain' drills to hone this, the BMX guys especially. @merlin or others who ride track may provide some better insight.

    I know for me that up to 110/120 rpm things are ok but once at that speed (or higher) for more than 5/10s my pedal stroke rapidly turns so choppy I rapidly lose effiency, control and technique. I'll regularly ride at 95/100rpm when putting efforts in on the road, telling myself I'm keeping on top of the gear and am able to carry speed on rolling terrain much more efficently. An easier/general flat ride my average is in the 80/90rpm kinda ballpark, something with several paced/stood climbs maybe even less.

    TCRN. Wow the guys have had to deal with some tough hot conditions, but some incredible riding, James Hayden clearly in the lead (just entering Poland) if he can keep it up.

    Zwift friend Derek has abandoned (didn't make it out of Germany with a knee injury). My Local guy is into his day 5 in Austria:
    Day 1 : 300 miles, 13,500ft climbing, 18 hours.
    Day 2 : 200 miles, 6,800ft climbing, 12 hours.
    Day 3 : 200 miles, 10,500ft climbing, 14 hours.
    Day 4 : 150 miles, 13,000ft climbing, 13 hours.

    Have a great weekend all! :cool:
     
  9. BennyC

    Capodecina

    Joined: 25 Sep 2006

    Posts: 13,946

    Clearly :p

    Track sprinters, whilst of course riding a fixed gear don't have much choice, can hit in excess of 200rpm. Though you wouldn't see that on the track, nor in a road race because out of the saddle not only is it probably impossible but more likely sub-optimal with regards to winning, to be in a gear you can spin that fast.
     
  10. merlin

    Capodecina

    Joined: 18 Oct 2002

    Posts: 20,674

    Location: England

    For fixed wheel training we do cadence drills at around 140 ish and try to hold in 3s 5s 10s spells, but we only ever do them towards the end of a training session when we have tired legs, its too easy otherwise.

    Different riders will have different natural cadence abilities, younger riders tend to have no choice but to spin because of BC gearing restrictions, but it's actually for their own good anyway - British Cycling coaches encourage cadence first power later, plus it's less strain on knees etc.

    Generally I'm a bit of a spinner, if j get too muscular my reserves dry up fast. I sit on top of gears, I only push when I need to.

    Horses for courses n all that.

    One thing I will say is that if you are a bigger muscular heavier rider and get wobbly at a high cadence then sometimes you can fix that by strengthening your core and/or pelvic muscle groups. Sucking in your lower abdomen and pushing your ass down into to saddle can help stabilise you.
     
  11. Berger

    Capodecina

    Joined: 22 May 2003

    Posts: 10,539

    Location: Wigan

    I’m sure someone on here had a GEO calculator they linked to or had.

    Wanting to know how changing stem and stem angle changes my dimensions and by how much!
     
  12. Jonny ///M

    Capodecina

    Joined: 23 Nov 2004

    Posts: 10,365

  13. NoNameNoNumber

    Soldato

    Joined: 25 Nov 2009

    Posts: 5,064

    Hi guys, quick Q regarding valve extenders.
    As per a recommendation earlier in the thread, my Chinese carbon wheelset arrived... I have fitted Continental valve extenders to the tubes but they're not threaded on the stem so they don't have a locking nut. Looks like they might rattle like a right bugger.
    Any tips?

    PS, don't worry about the length of the valve stem on the front... I have some shorter ones en route :D

    [​IMG]
     
  14. uv

    Sgarrista

    Joined: 16 May 2006

    Posts: 8,435

    Location: Manchester

    I fixed that issue by putting some electrical tape on the valves - you'll need to take the tubes out though to tape where they sit on the rim.
     
  15. NoNameNoNumber

    Soldato

    Joined: 25 Nov 2009

    Posts: 5,064

    Ok, simple enough fix :)
     
  16. Berger

    Capodecina

    Joined: 22 May 2003

    Posts: 10,539

    Location: Wigan

    Cut a drinking straw down and then put a cut in it and slot it over the valve, tiny blob of super glue holds it in place.

    Looks a little tidier than electrical tape but not as simple fix!
     
  17. Trox

    Mobster

    Joined: 18 Oct 2002

    Posts: 2,866

    Location: Fife, Scotland

    Chains...

    I just checked mine and it seems I need to replace it before the cassette takes on damage.
    The current chain is the standard one the bike came with, KMC X11L, which has lasted a good 3885 miles...

    My question is should i stick another KMC on or go the Shimano route (quick link Ultegra)?
     
  18. UTmaniac

    Soldato

    Joined: 9 Nov 2005

    Posts: 6,212

    Location: Southampton

    Aren't Shimano chains made by KMC?
     
  19. Trox

    Mobster

    Joined: 18 Oct 2002

    Posts: 2,866

    Location: Fife, Scotland

    Hmm I've no idea mate, swaying towards the KMC branded one as it seems to review well on wiggle..
     
    Last edited: 4 Aug 2018
  20. Berger

    Capodecina

    Joined: 22 May 2003

    Posts: 10,539

    Location: Wigan

    Much of a muchness I think. Just pick something middle priced from KMC, Shimano or Sram and be happy.