1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Samsung Q70 calibration settings

Discussion in 'Home Cinema & Hi-Fi' started by chili, 4 Feb 2020.

  1. chili

    Hitman

    Joined: 19 Mar 2011

    Posts: 559

    New Q70 owner and would like some pointers for screen calibration. The tv will not be used for gaming or as a pc monitor it will be purely for Sky, netflix, amazon and Movies.

    I have also read that samsung say their qleds will not suffer from screen burn due to quantum dot tech, is this the case or is just marketing.

    thanks
     
  2. hornetstinger

    Soldato

    Joined: 6 Sep 2016

    Posts: 6,965

    LCD don't get screen burn.

    Typically settings is to disable everything, use a warmer temperature. Watch BBC news pay attention to the white box, it should be white not blue, so use a colour temp like warm to get it a white white not a blue or red white.

    Disable dynamic contrast, motion plus, any edge enhancment, colour enhancement etc
     
  3. hornetstinger

    Soldato

    Joined: 6 Sep 2016

    Posts: 6,965

    Oh change preset mode from dynamic to cinema then tweak settings
     
  4. rhysduck

    Soldato

    Joined: 25 Oct 2009

    Posts: 6,346

    Location: Nelson, South Wales

  5. chili

    Hitman

    Joined: 19 Mar 2011

    Posts: 559

    So the 75" q70 falls into the lcd catagory am i reading it correct that it is a lcd tv with led backlights and the q is for qauntum dots?

    thanks
     
  6. lucid

    Soldato

    Joined: 29 May 2010

    Posts: 5,377

    Location: Cheshire

    If we're talking new TVs, then there's really only really two technologies. It's either OLED or LCD.

    OLED is the spiritual successor to plasma. In both technologies, the light source is the pixel itself.

    For LCD, the light source is a separate element. In older LCD TVs with a thicker back, the light source was miniature fluorescent tubes. When LED lighting got good enough to be used, that's when you started to see the change to TVs being marketed as LED.

    The most striking difference was the thickness of the TV. They no longer needed to be 7-10cm thick to accommodate the florescent tubes, so we started to see screens reduce their depth down to a couple of centimetres. Your Samsung LED TV is - like most TVs sold today - an LCD set with an LED backlighting system.

    There are differing types of LCD panel. Quantum dot is a bit of a marketing term to make the acronym QLED which looks very much like the acronym OLED. The actual tech though is genuine. It does perform better than a common VA or IPS LCD panel.
     
  7. hornetstinger

    Soldato

    Joined: 6 Sep 2016

    Posts: 6,965

    Also you'll want to send native resolution and minimise over or under scanning, so if your TV is 4k you want to send 4k resolution and displaying 1:1 pixels this can be checked with test screens which have a arrow on each corner so if part of the arrow is missing it's zooming out. I think Samsung's aspect mode for 1:1 is called "just scan"
     
  8. mmj_uk

    Capodecina

    Joined: 26 Dec 2003

    Posts: 24,316

    Your best bet is to find someone to come out and professionally calibrate it, those discs you can buy with the glasses are only really decent for badly calibrated TV's out of the box. It's a waste of time using settings posted by others all TV's are different.
     
  9. hornetstinger

    Soldato

    Joined: 6 Sep 2016

    Posts: 6,965

    If you're used to calibrating TV's can certainly make it better but things like cut and gain values with RGB and CMYK not a chance. But usual contrast, brightness, colour, sharpness, colour temp, and backlight get pretty good once you spend some time on it.