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Subnetting

Discussion in 'Networks & Internet Connectivity' started by Ricochet J, 16 Feb 2006.

  1. Ricochet J

    Capodecina

    Joined: 29 Jun 2004

    Posts: 12,904

    Are there any online tutorials that teach subnetting? The sheet i've got is, lets say not human freindly :p

    Thanks alot :)
     
  2. MAllen

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 24 Feb 2003

    Posts: 2,236

    Location: Brighton, UK

    What do you need to know? Isn't there something in the sticky above?

    Simplest way I look at subnetting is to work in Binary. Then it is real simple. :)
     
  3. Ricochet J

    Capodecina

    Joined: 29 Jun 2004

    Posts: 12,904

  4. MAllen

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 24 Feb 2003

    Posts: 2,236

    Location: Brighton, UK

    Site looked interesting... but it would help if he would learn how to create a website. Seeing old warnings about "IE 6.0 or Netscape 7.0" is annoying for us Opera and Firefox users when big chunks of the site fail to display.... :(


    As to subnetting - are you learning this for a course? For splitting up an office network? Or just for curiosity? If it's the latter.... then just use the Class C defaults of 255.255.255.0 to keep life simple. :)
     
  5. Ricochet J

    Capodecina

    Joined: 29 Jun 2004

    Posts: 12,904

    Cisco CCNA MAllen. The wise crack teachers seam to assume alot. They assumed we would know how to do it :confused:
    Furthermore they gave us a three router lab to do. They asumed we knew what to do. Once again, :confused:
     
  6. sja360

    Mobster

    Joined: 28 Jul 2003

    Posts: 3,939

    Location: Dundee

    tbh its similar to us, but we havent had any practical experience with subnetting and the other server features on server 2003. it would help loads if we did say even a hour of good teaching on it, problem is they expect us to wipe our home machines to play about with it, and i would but i dont have a second machine really, and there is little point in trying to setup a network with one machine! :p
     
  7. Ricochet J

    Capodecina

    Joined: 29 Jun 2004

    Posts: 12,904

    Exactly mate! And all they ever do is "Okay so you're in class. Good. Open up the curriculum and go go go!"

    So all of us are looking at each other "Aren't you going to teach us?"
     
  8. sja360

    Mobster

    Joined: 28 Jul 2003

    Posts: 3,939

    Location: Dundee

    lol yea, i've got a 100 page report based on a case scenario. to be done for next thursday i've got 12 pages :(
    basically about 20 windows 98 workstations and 1 NT4 server currently, with only file storage and email on the server, and a slow 56k connection, and we have to upgrade it for £20,000. but now he provided us with a change in requirements £15,000 and vpn access to the work for a sales department... man this isnt easy specially when you havent done alot of the stuff practically before.
     
  9. Ricochet J

    Capodecina

    Joined: 29 Jun 2004

    Posts: 12,904

    Yeh I know!
    So what Semester you on?
     
  10. sja360

    Mobster

    Joined: 28 Jul 2003

    Posts: 3,939

    Location: Dundee

    :confused:
    im doing a HND computing course at college, not uni or anything.
    i presume this is your 3rd year at uni or ?
    (have no idea how the system works down south)
     
  11. S_D

    Gangster

    Joined: 12 Jul 2005

    Posts: 358

    Hiya.

    Understanding TCP/IP subnetting is a pre-requisite for CCNA nowadays, especially since they've amalgamated the 2 courses into one and it's a 5 day'er. Pick up the IP Subnet Calculator from the web (google for it) and use it to check the results.

    The best bet with subnetting (until you get to know it better) is to look at it all in binary, as has been suggested. It will get better, trust me, and soon you'll be able to quote entire subnets just from an IP address and slash notation, it just takes practice.

    Simon
     
  12. Ricochet J

    Capodecina

    Joined: 29 Jun 2004

    Posts: 12,904

    Cheers S_D. I'm still learning it, thanks :)

    sja360 i'm in college, first year. Not in uni :p
     
  13. sja360

    Mobster

    Joined: 28 Jul 2003

    Posts: 3,939

    Location: Dundee

    so whats your course called?? as up here it was SGA Computing then its HNC (2nd year) and the third year (HND) then its onto a degree with a university.
     
  14. Ricochet J

    Capodecina

    Joined: 29 Jun 2004

    Posts: 12,904

    The course is called Cisco CCNA. Its split into 4 semesters. I thought you were doing it too. Once you've completed the course and passed you get a CCNA qualification which stands for "Certified Cisco Network Associate". Sounds fancy eh?
    I've seen some people put it beside thier names too :p
    e.g. John Smith (CCNA)
     
  15. sja360

    Mobster

    Joined: 28 Jul 2003

    Posts: 3,939

    Location: Dundee

    i though the cisco courses we're all like MS one's either its a few weeks of hard graft etc, instead of full on 4 years of it. how much does it cost for you doing the course?
     
  16. Ricochet J

    Capodecina

    Joined: 29 Jun 2004

    Posts: 12,904

    Nope. The Cisco course is as long as you want it to be. Ideally the course is two years, and 2 semesters in each year hence 4 semesters. Therefore semesters 1 and 2 in year 1 and semesters 3 and 4 in year 2. And the reason its in semesters is because its an American course. :rolleyes:
    But like I said earlier. If you want to push yourself and do it in half a year fine. But if you want to take your time and do it over 2 years like me its also okay. However you only pay for a certain number of hours of learning from an instructor, like 152 hours or something which obviously means you cannot do it over like 7 years or something silly like that :p

    The course price is around £3000. You can pay for the whole course or break it down and pay in semesters or can just pay for the final exam and teach your self. I think the final exam is something like £250 if you only want to pay for that. But I get my Cisco course free because I choose it as a course for my college options.
    So in college i'm doing A levels:
    Mathematics
    Physics
    Graphics
    General Studies
    And qualification Cisco CCNA

    However if you were to do it externally you would have to pay for the course.

    :) Hope that clarifies things :)