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Very good news!

Discussion in 'Speaker's Corner' started by Johnny Girth, 19 May 2006.

  1. Johnny Girth

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 20 Oct 2004

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    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/4995268.stm

    Jamie Oliver is an absolute legend. The guys deserves a knighthood for his campaign. I don't think people appreciate the effect that giving kids absolute junk in the most important stage of their developing life has. I'm certain that it has both a massive physical and mental effect and by ridding schools of the junk it's not just healthy in the traditional less obesity dimension but will also affect attitudes, behaviour and mental ability.

    Fantastic!
     
  2. Visage

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    I agree completely.

    Could this be one of those rare occasions when everyone in SC agrees that the government has done a Good Thing?
     
  3. ballistic

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    I like him, but he's wife is a p***** she's too scared to go on the tube :rolleyes:
     
  4. Vonhelmet

    Caporegime

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    I'm likewise impressed. He's used his fame to get behind a good cause and it looks like he's really achieving something. Good lad.
     
  5. earlyflash

    Gangster

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    Very good news, but we'll have to differ on our opinions on that bloomin fake mockney.
     
  6. anarchist

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    Yip, excellent news.

    It will be interesting to see how they enforce it, and how effective it will be, but it has to be a good thing :)
     
  7. afraser2k

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    Source: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/4987966.stm

    I doubt this policy is going to change the health of kids anytime soon.
     
  8. Johnny Girth

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 20 Oct 2004

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    True, kids will try to find a way round it but the schools need to do everything they can to try and prevent this. Like taking sweet machines out of schools.

    The problem is that the food is addictive. Sugar, salt, fat - add it together and it's been shown to be extremely addictive. Weening the kids off is important so they're not hooked on the horrid food they're being served.

    I'll admit that I actually used to love school dinners at secondary school - greasy pizzas, chips, chicken burgers and chocolate crispy/jam rolly polly and custard. But now I eat an extremely healthy diet and don't get the cravings for crap food all the time. Maybe this generation of goods will still suffer from black market dealings but hopefully it'll be worthwhile for those up-and-coming ones who won't ever have to eat such crap.
     
  9. anarchist

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    Yes, obviously some kids (and their parents) will do anything to get junk down their necks. I'm thinking about the Jamie Oliver programme where, because he had taken junk food off the menu, the parents hung around outside the school gates with maccies happy meals for their kids.

    What's important though is that plenty of kids will change their eating habits as a result of this legislation, so we shouldn't dismiss the whole thing as a waste of time and money.
     
  10. Vonhelmet

    Caporegime

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    A former dinner lady said on BBC breakfast that this has to be viewed as a long term programme. For example - it'll be a nightmare getting a year 11 kid to change their eating habits, after 11 years of junk. A year 7 kid will be easier. A year 1 kid will be a doddle.
     
  11. WushuMaster

    Hitman

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    The only way this will work is if schools are providing good quality food. Washed up cabbage leaves may be healthy, but i wouldnt eat them so no kid would. It will mean providing an healthy but appealing option for the kids otherwise this campaign will be short lived and the chips will make a return.
     
  12. starscream

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    Well I do agree that this a good thing, but I can see kids just sneaking out at lunchtimes and stocking up on sweets and chocolate from newsagents. To be honest there's very little that can be done to stop that, and overall, it's a good idea.
     
  13. PikeyPriest

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 21 Jun 2004

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    We need to get kids doing more exercise along with the food changes. Compared to 50 years ago the diet isnt that much different (even with the new processed meals), but exercise levels have drastically fallen for all kids. I just hope policies of selling school fields..etc can be halted and exercise made a fun and important part of school life (for social as well as physical benefits).
     
  14. Johnny Girth

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    That's another good point. I don't understand kids these days, I used to love sport at school, so much so that I took GCSE PE as an option.

    Mainly girls that don't seem to like doing sports as they're too vain. But we can't have that, we don't need any more obese women in this country.
     
  15. afraser2k

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    I agree it's a good idea, I just don't think it will work. I'd give it a few years and once the media backs off the schools will go back complaining it's too expensive and the government aren't funding the scheme properly.

    I hope I'm wrong on this though.
     
  16. FishFluff

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    Excellent news, however getting kids to eat healthily at school is only half the battle. The real change is needed at home where kids are being served frozen crap fresh out of the microwave because parents are too tired/lazy to cook properly for their kids.

    Back in my day (god that makes me sound old, I'm only 25) my dad worked full time but my mum only worked in the mornings. As a result every single teatime consisted of a home cooked meal with at least 2 different kinds of veg. Compare that to what many kids get served up now, especially in single parent households where the parent is knackered from working to make ends meet, and it's not hard to see how they get addicted to junk food. What's the answer? No idea :p
     
  17. anarchist

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    It wasn't an option in my day. Everybody did PE, twice or three times a week. I gather that isn't the case any more? :(
     
  18. K.C. Leblanc

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    This is a step in the right direction and a very good move. It will particularly help with those who received free school dinners.

    However the majority of students these days don't eat school meals, they bring stuff from home or buy it on their way to school. At the end of the day childen's parents and not their school are mostly reponsible for how children eat.

    It think this should also be supplemented with law banning shops from serving under 16s durring school hours, unless they're with a parent or have a pass issued by their school. This would help parents who want to steer their children towards the new healthier school dinners.

    It would in the long run lower truency since many big stores would probably ban school children durring school hours entirely (if they're not allowed to spend money what else will the do in the stores).

    Another thing would be scemes to get students involved in the production of school meals. Cooking is an important life skill that seems to be lacking in many people. The aproach to it's teaching in schools is boring and often irrevent, students need to be taught how to feed a family healily and cost effectively not how to create and market a food product. Most of my food technology lessons were spend writing surveys for my class mates and designing advertising. We only seemed to cook something about once a month.
     
    Last edited: 20 May 2006
  19. p4radox

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    Yeah, great news. There's actually some decent stuff available in the school diner now!:)

    Did anyone see the BBC's TV report on this last night?
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/nolavconsole/...s=1&nbwm=1&bbwm=1&bbram=1&nol_storyid=4996296

    My school (Boston Spa) was featured. The bit with the kids caught smuggling sweets into school is comedy gold - about 2 minutes into the report. "We sell it for profit and we make like, £80 a day". :p
     
  20. Nix

    Capodecina

    Joined: 26 Dec 2005

    Posts: 19,841

    One battle over with, the next is getting the kids to actually eat it.

    I'm hoping we may see an improvement in education too, I've heard that a bad diet can cause lack of concentration and disruption in class.

    Well done Jamie. He's effectively brought attention to an issue that some people have been shouting about but been going unheard for years.