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What "man jobs" have you done today?

Discussion in 'Home and Garden' started by jaybee, 18 Aug 2012.

  1. FBi7

    Hitman

    Joined: 19 Jun 2009

    Posts: 974

    Location: Central Scotland

    As I'm about to move into my new home in the very near future, I find myself spending more and more time in this section of the forum. Mainly for hints, tips, advice, inspiration and just generally to participate with like-minded individuals.

    Today, my new dining room furniture arrived. It's for the new place, but as there's been all sorts of pandemic-related delays of late, I decided to order early. As annoying as I find their adverts, we purchased from Oak Furniture Land. Not cheap, but I'm not entirely sure if this places me superior to the 'Live Love Laugh' above the corner sofa brigade or not??? ( know this isn't GD, but we can still say that, right?)

    Anyhoo, my manly tasks today: 1 - attaching seat pads to dining room chairs and then repacking the chairs in the boxes they came in, 2 - planning other stuff to buy for the new place, and 3 - I ironed 4 sets of uniform for my run of shifts which start tomorrow :D
     
  2. gav_172

    Gangster

    Joined: 17 Nov 2015

    Posts: 159

    Sums the last year up really, half the population thinking rules don't apply to them. All fun and games until someone looses their livelihood because a bloke with 5 chickens thinks he knows better. Typifies the general publics attitude to agriculture in this country so doesn't surprise me. Walk where we want do what we want, ignore all the rules, who needs farms or farmers .....
     
  3. Buffman

    Sgarrista

    Joined: 4 May 2007

    Posts: 7,888

    Location: West Midlands

    That floor and angling looks great!

    Was the floor easy enough to fit? (is it click lock/engineered wood?)

    Ive fit wood floor before but not at 45 degrees! Tempted to try it in my new place.
     
  4. Mason-

    Soldato

    Joined: 18 Jun 2010

    Posts: 5,796

    Location: Essex

    Put coving + dado/picture rail up.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  5. apg

    Gangster

    Joined: 4 Dec 2013

    Posts: 146

    Looks good. I see you are using nails to keep the coving in position. What adhesive are you using to fix it in place?
     
  6. gav_172

    Gangster

    Joined: 17 Nov 2015

    Posts: 159

    Looks good. Is it proper plaster cove?
     
  7. kai

    Mobster

    Joined: 15 Oct 2007

    Posts: 2,945

    Location: Wales.

    Yeah, its a floor designed for herringbone and can be laid in a number of patterns. This particular brand even had marking on the cork underside to tell you if its a left or right piece.
     
  8. Mason-

    Soldato

    Joined: 18 Jun 2010

    Posts: 5,796

    Location: Essex

    Cheers :)
    Yes the coving is plaster coving. The dado/picture rail is Orac (plastic).
    Cheers :)

    Yeah, it probably didn't need it, but I just put them there to make sure it doesn't move while the adhesive goes off. Also when doing the your test fits if you put the bottom nails in then, you can just pivot it up off of the nails. I used Knauf Cove Adhesive for the coving. It's really good but if you are going to use it on bare plaster, make the mix a little wetter than you'd think and also brush the plaster with a wet brush first. The walls suck the moisture instantly otherwise and make it really had to wiggle it into place.

    And as the picture rail was Orac, I used their adhesive + joint compound for the picture rail.
     
  9. gav_172

    Gangster

    Joined: 17 Nov 2015

    Posts: 159

    We used the Orac coving, and its amazing stuff! Goes up so quick. How comes you didn't go Orac for both?
     
  10. Buffman

    Sgarrista

    Joined: 4 May 2007

    Posts: 7,888

    Location: West Midlands

    Sounds good! How much per square metre?
     
  11. bainbridge

    Mobster

    Joined: 9 Dec 2009

    Posts: 4,018

    Location: Bristol

    Got most of the slabs laid, just 2 full slabs to go and then it's time to move onto the cuts around the edge. Once that's done I can joint the thing up and sit out there and have a rest! It's slow going doing it all by yourself.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  12. Buffman

    Sgarrista

    Joined: 4 May 2007

    Posts: 7,888

    Location: West Midlands

    Looks good! What's the rough cost/sqm or total for that area ? Have you done it before? Did you have to get a whacker plate/similar down to the underside to ensure a level base?

    Id like to do similar with my new garden
     
  13. shiver

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 13 Jun 2007

    Posts: 1,088

    Location: London

  14. 200sols

    Soldato

    Joined: 14 Jan 2018

    Posts: 6,657

    Location: Hampshire

    Nice work. No 4 corners joining job well done.
     
  15. kai

    Mobster

    Joined: 15 Oct 2007

    Posts: 2,945

    Location: Wales.

    I bought a lot of flooring so had volume discount. For me it worked out about £34 sqm
     
  16. bainbridge

    Mobster

    Joined: 9 Dec 2009

    Posts: 4,018

    Location: Bristol

    Thanks. The full cost of materials (including drainage), machinery and skip hire came to £79.64 per m2.

    I've not laid a stone patio before but am a qualified brickie (many years ago with Wimpey) so I know my way around a spirit level. Having said that, I think anyone with a bit of common sense and patience, who isn't afraid of taking on something new could do this work to a good standard.

    Yes I hired a whacker, it was about £60 for the weekend. It was advertised as £35 but with £5 delivery each way and vat it was £60. I put down half of the sub base material and compacted it, then put down the other half on top, and compacted again. I could have done it in a day but I work full time so only have weekends spare, the weather forecast was patchy and because I'm doing it alone I wanted more time if needed. It was only £15 more than 1 day hire anyway.

    A couple of other things which I hope you find helpful:

    Skips. They did a discount for just soil/stone rather than domestic waste, so do enquire when ordering a skip.

    Stone slabs. I anticipated a few breakages, what with them being shipped all the way from India, so bought a 20m2 crate for my 17m2, however upon arrival not one single slab out of 64 was broken. They were cleverly stacked in the crate and a small offcut wedged in there held the stone like a solid block. Had I known this I would've bought a 18m2 pack, but I'll make a nice doorstep out of one of the leftover tombstones and find a use for the others.

    Cement mixer. With it being a project for weekends only, I calculated it would be cheaper to buy a mixer rather than rent it to sit unused during the week. I bought this little beauty for £219 and she runs like a dream:

    https://www.screwfix.com/p/134-ltr-...ABrrBl1t7wYnJPo-YTMaAuJ2EALw_wcB&gclsrc=aw.ds

    They sell used for between £150 and £200 used so I'll probably sell it once finished, though I am becoming attached to it lol. Without the cost of the mixer the project is £66.58 per m2.
     
  17. bainbridge

    Mobster

    Joined: 9 Dec 2009

    Posts: 4,018

    Location: Bristol

    Thanks, tbh I did spot a + joint on my drawing I hadn't noticed but swapped a big square and small rectangle for a big tombstone to get rid of it!

    Thanks for your advice with stone choice etc btw.
     
  18. Terminal_Boy

    Sgarrista

    Joined: 13 Apr 2013

    Posts: 8,990

    Location: La France

    Hosed out the grease trap in one of our fossé septiques. No photos to follow.
     
  19. Thomas. PLease.

    Soldato

    Joined: 5 Jul 2007

    Posts: 5,352

    Location: London

    Following on from my can I do laminate flooring thread. Seemed to go ok so far. I'm even parallel with the hall so can hopefully go one run for the hall into the kitchen.

    [​IMG]
     
  20. fobose

    Soldato

    Joined: 6 Dec 2005

    Posts: 5,320

    Location: Cambridge, UK.

    Looks great @Thomas. PLease. Glad you opted to take the skirting off for a much better finish!