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What's the hardest mathematical thing you know?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Arnie, 26 Apr 2012.

  1. Boycey0211

    Soldato

    Joined: 27 Apr 2011

    Posts: 5,605

    Location: Norfolk

    probably maths based electrical laws, thats some crazy **** once you get into it!
     
  2. pingwing

    Capodecina

    Joined: 9 Apr 2008

    Posts: 19,562

    Location: Bedford

    Exactly where I got too.

    Never found a sensible use for it though :(

    My Stats 1 module though has been a gold mine of reports, uni work and disproving lecturers for their mad (read TERRIBLE) use of statistics on nationalism.
     
  3. JayMax

    Mobster

    Joined: 2 Nov 2002

    Posts: 2,795

    I learnt this too, and also that 0.9r = 1 :p
     
  4. King Damager

    Capodecina

    Joined: 16 Nov 2010

    Posts: 16,481

    Location: London Burger Place

    [GD]Shayper.[/GD]

    I did the Differential Equations, but did Matrices last year which I think is technically FP1/2 level.

    My general 'stats' knowledge vastly outweighs my maths knowledge though. DW tests, F-Tests, T-Tests, Gauss Markov Theorem's etc... A lot of Econometrics basically.

    kd
     
  5. Castiel

    Perma Banned

    Joined: 26 Jun 2010

    Posts: 0

    Maths is entirely overrated......it has no real-world application whatsover and we would be all better off learning something constructive, something like pancake tossing.

    I was going to leave the 's' off Maths, but didn't want to overdo it......





    /troll.
     
  6. Lysander

    Capodecina

    Joined: 1 Aug 2005

    Posts: 16,508

    Location: Flatland

    Watch it.
     
  7. King Damager

    Capodecina

    Joined: 16 Nov 2010

    Posts: 16,481

    Location: London Burger Place

    Fixed for you.

    kd
     
  8. Jokester

    Don

    Joined: 7 Aug 2003

    Posts: 41,628

    Location: Aberdeenshire

    I remember doing something at university to do with Gauss and magnetic flux, but on top of that stuff like Laplace and Fourier transforms I could never get my head round. Long forgotten though.
     
  9. rogan

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 15 Jul 2011

    Posts: 1,528

    Location: London

    FFT's and gaussian elimination were a bi**h, in C, even worse.
     
  10. Castiel

    Perma Banned

    Joined: 26 Jun 2010

    Posts: 0

    Ha! Century old texts are for beginners.....I have millennia old ones to play with now....:p
     
  11. Castiel

    Perma Banned

    Joined: 26 Jun 2010

    Posts: 0

    Quite right too, Pancake tossing is a much needed skill......
     
  12. Castiel

    Perma Banned

    Joined: 26 Jun 2010

    Posts: 0

    :D
     
  13. Freefaller

    Man of Honour

    Joined: 5 Jun 2003

    Posts: 87,239

    Location: Falling...

    Not really super complicated but it's what I use at work.

    Regression and correlation analysis and gauge R&R (repeatability and reproducibility)

    which are Six Sigma tools.
     
  14. marc_howarth

    Gangster

    Joined: 29 Jul 2005

    Posts: 445

    Location: Matlock

    Grobner bases are probably the most complicated thing I've studied at uni, thankfully we have programs like Maple to help out...
     
  15. lukeharvest

    Hitman

    Joined: 3 Dec 2006

    Posts: 730

    Location: Oxford

    Any part of my degree lol.
     
  16. Tute

    Capodecina

    Joined: 24 Jul 2004

    Posts: 22,371

    Location: Devon, UK

    For me, control engineering with transforms, laplace, fourier etc.

    It's just taught to us by someone with poor English, in parrot form.
     
  17. Krono5

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 16 Dec 2008

    Posts: 1,091

    1+1 = 2
     
  18. BlackDragon

    Mobster

    Joined: 9 Jun 2006

    Posts: 2,630

    At uni I studied a lot of Artificial Intelligence stuff, I understood the concepts quite easily in comparison to the maths that they go into. E.g. For bio-inspired computing would cover how neural networks can be used to learn patterns, and how 'energy' stabilises. Computer vision was probably the most intensive, with one of the hardest stuff to grasp was how to recognise 'depth' in an image using all sorts of algorithms.
     
  19. Strife212

    Capodecina

    Joined: 15 Dec 2007

    Posts: 16,574

    Supposedly, set theory, Fourier analysis, and so on, in reality, not much :p
     
  20. Noxia

    Sgarrista

    Joined: 30 Dec 2010

    Posts: 8,678

    Location: Wiltshire

    Fractions, other than halves and quarters.