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When can things be filmed in HDTV technology?

Discussion in 'Home Cinema & Hi-Fi' started by smoove, 16 Jun 2006.

  1. smoove

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    I mean, is HDTV filmed in it or are is the process done later through digital enchancement or just the display capability?

    Things I think about when Im under the influence on a friday is beyond worrying. :rolleyes: <Yess you, you stupid roll eyes, hate you, bugger of smily.
     
  2. Werewolf

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    they've been recording a lot of stuff in HD for years, and any half decent film print can be made into HD for broadcast I beleive.
     
  3. Duke

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    Isn't everything already in 'hdtv' / high resolution but they just reduce it for TV/DVD etc.
     
  4. Goatboy

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    35mm film contains far more detail than HDTV so any film recorded that way (nearly all of them) can be transferred to HD

    TV shows/sport have been recorded in SD and now HD cameras are replacing them.
     
  5. Clarkey

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    as above really, if its recorded on film then its scanned with higher resolution. If using digital camera's then a higher res CCD is needed. I guess the reason its only just come to light is because we now have the technology to cope with the massive bandwidth requirements, I just pressed a few buttons and worked out that a 1080i capture at 25fps would be 98MB/s assuming the camera's use 16bpp which I think they do. Obviously thats before compression but thats whats going to need to be sent around and processed in realtime for a live broadcast.
     
  6. Kol

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    Stupid question as I know 'film' surpasses HD resolutions, but what kind of resolution is it? As in, Cinemas and what not. Obviously it must be insanely high for the size of screen they're using.
     
  7. William

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    Erm, I think a decent shot on 35mm is about 14-24M Pixels.
     
  8. Goatboy

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    Film resolution is in the region of 4000x2000
     
  9. Kol

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    Cheers fellas.
     
  10. NathanE

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    So if standard 35mm that has been used for years can be used for HiDef what's all this talk that the World Cup and BBC's Planet Earth is/was filmed using special HD cameras? :confused:
     
  11. William

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    Might be digital not film.
     
  12. Spyhop

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    I'm pretty sure you can get consumer camcorders that capture in HD these days. Film your dog in HD!
     
  13. Scam

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    About 4500 x 2500 according to my diss :)

    Theres no real way to quantify resolution from film, it's all estimates. They used to think it was more like 1,800 lines across. When they projected something digitally at that resolution, they then wondered why it looked terrible!

    Dont forget film degrades though, if you watch a well-used reel in the cinema, in lamen's terms you might be watching at more like 1K resolution rather than what it was when it was fresh.

    HDTV resolutions are all obviously less than digital cinema though, although there's plenty of HD cameras out, theres only one or two that can run at 4.5kx2.5k (planned resolution for digital cinema projection). http://www.red.com caused a nice stir at this years NAB (the guy that owns Oakleys is behind that).

    Oh, and to turn film into digital you use a telecine machine, the result is a digital intermediate. Done for probably all of feature-films nowadays, as all editing and effects are obviously digital. The dumb thing is, that they're then put back on to film for exhibition.

    meh, i knew that diss would come in useful :p
     
  14. Goatboy

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    Film has to be transferred therefore it makes sense to use HD cameras in the first place.
     
  15. Fr0dders

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    so is the stuff shot in film

    converted into digital for editing etc..

    and then put back onto film ?
     
  16. Clarkey

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    for films, yes.

    As for the BBC, they will be digital camera's, you can't very well transfer 35mm to digital, add computer graphic overlays, resize and compress in realtime :p
     
  17. pinkaardvark

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    Well live remote location sport obviously has to be uplinked to a satellite and down again to local transmitter station so this has to be done digitally therefore the lowest bandwidth required is used. This is also true of live news broadcasts where there is always a decision to be made about quality versus to to get pictures to studio.