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Why didn't I get one sooner?

Discussion in 'Motors' started by Demontec, 29 May 2006.

  1. Demontec

    Gangster

    Joined: 3 Feb 2003

    Posts: 435

    Hey guys.

    I took my full bike licence 2 years ago. I have however been riding bikes since I was 16. I started off on mopeds and got a RS125 when I was 17. As soon as I turned 21 I took my full bike licence and passed first time.

    Instead of going straight onto a sports 600 I thought it best to slowly work my work through some sensible bikes to gain experience.

    The first bike I got after passing my full test was a Bandit 600. Cheap insurance and cheap to buy. Great for a commuter but I was looking for a sunday bike not a commuting bike so thought it best to get a sports bike.

    I bought myself a VFR400 NC30 and what a step up in performance terms that was, I was gaining valuable experience on bikes and kept the vfr for about 1 year.

    I wanted a change in bikes and decided to go the Supermoto route with a KTM 640 LC4. I really did not get on with this bike at all and found it dreadful to ride, hard to start and deafening. This was quickly replaced with a RVF400 NC35 (the newer version to the NC30 with minor changes).

    I honestly felt that it was a good idea going through the 400 sports first before going to the bigger boys. I could of easily afforded a cbr 600 as the RVF's demand a prenium but I thought it was best to learn before going for the big boys.

    Well on Saturday I took the plunge and bought a 2004 GSXR 600 K4. This is one awesome bike and to be honest soooo much easier to ride than anything I have ridden before. In fact it feels much more safer than anything I have ridden before. So much so that I am in fact regretting going through the 400's to get here.

    Yes its capable of going 170mph+ but I wouldn't of gone to those speeds after first passing my test. The whole ride feels safer - better breaks, more responsive and alot more forgiving.

    Now my question. Did my previous riding history teach me to respect this bike more and give me valuable riding experience or did going through the 400's on a 15 year old bike which I paid the same amount for that I could get a 2000 plate cbr just put me more at risk in terms of safety (with it being 15 years old)?

    I don't really know what the meaning of this thread is. I think mainly to boast about my new toy :p :p . It's the first time I have cleaned a motor vechicle in 6 years. I havn't stopped grinning since I picked it up. But it has been sooo much fun I feel my early years have been wasted.
     
  2. Foghorn Leghorn

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 5 Jul 2003

    Posts: 2,414

    Location: Cheshire

    Definitely.

    Most people learn to ride in there late teens, because of this they cant jump onto 600cc plus bikes purely because of the cost of buying and insurance. So they usually go up in stages 125>250-400>600 and so on.

    You can still get in big trouble on smaller bikes, but not quite as easily. Most of my mates (and me ;) ) came up through the stages and are better riders for it, a few others passed there tests in there mid 20's and jumped straight onto 750's etc, and promptly fell off them, alot.

    Enjoy your GSXR, I couldnt believe the difference when I went from my 400 to a CBR600 :D

    Fog
     
  3. thebrasso

    Soldato

    Joined: 18 Oct 2002

    Posts: 5,312

    I've never had a go of a motorbike, but I imagine apart from the power issue, a smaller bike to start with (say a 400 instead of a big 750 or something) would give you less problems in terms of handling the bike. I know big bikes are heavy, could you come unstuck misjuding your entry into a corner and because of the weight not be able to correct it? Hopefully that makes sense.

    I'll learn to ride, but not for a few years when I have the income and my own place.
     
  4. mr jamez

    Hitman

    Joined: 23 Nov 2003

    Posts: 755

    The 400's weigh the same, sometimes more, than their bigger brothers.