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You have been medically advised not to drive...

Discussion in 'Motors' started by BrenOS, 14 May 2006.

  1. BrenOS

    Mobster

    Joined: 18 Oct 2002

    Posts: 3,267

    Location: The Castle

    Not outright told you aren't fit to be behind the wheel, but advised against it for the meantime. In the same league as 'drink in moderation'.

    Are there any repercussions here?

    Not for me, and just hypothetical at this stage. Suprise me by not flaming me :)
     
  2. Conanius

    Capodecina

    Joined: 18 Oct 2002

    Posts: 12,488

    erm, guess it depends what for...

    if its like medical advice off a doctor due to antibiotics/anesthetic from an op/inury or whatever... dont even consider it, as your driving without insurance....
     
  3. JRS

    Capodecina

    Joined: 6 Jun 2004

    Posts: 16,539

    Location: Burton-on-Trent

    It does depend on the circumstances behind the advice. I've been advised by doctors not to drive as my left knee is pretty messed up (my daily driver Fiat doesn't have an automatic 'box, the Olds would be far too expensive to run all the time). When they told me, I did say to them that I wouldn't be taking any notice :)
     
  4. andi

    Capodecina

    Joined: 18 Oct 2002

    Posts: 12,712

    Location: Manchester

    Just remember, that if the worst was to happen, and you'd been warned not to drive, police/insurance could be slightly annoyed..
     
  5. JRS

    Capodecina

    Joined: 6 Jun 2004

    Posts: 16,539

    Location: Burton-on-Trent

    Insurance company has been informed in my case - didn't think it would be a good idea to leave it to chance so told them, I have it in writing that they aren't bothered :)
     
  6. BrenOS

    Mobster

    Joined: 18 Oct 2002

    Posts: 3,267

    Location: The Castle

    Basically my sister has felt faint and blacked out twice in the last 12 months, around the time of the month for her. She gets plenty of warning if shes going to be unwell but the docs have said if shes prone to blacking out then she shouldn't be driving.

    She's only 18 and just passed her test this week. I personally don't think there are any legal implications here. Obviously if she was epileptic then that's different, but she's only young and I think her troubles have passed.

    Any final legal decision here?
     
  7. tickle me elmo

    Gangster

    Joined: 11 Nov 2005

    Posts: 362

    well i hope she doesnt drive near me...... :mad:
     
  8. Brycheiniog

    Hitman

    Joined: 18 Oct 2002

    Posts: 866

    The DVLA says:-

    "Which medical conditions do DVLA want to know about?

    You must tell us if you have ever had, or currently suffer from, any of the following medical conditions. Please select one of the two links below, depending upon which class of vehicle licence you are applying for or currently hold:"

    This information from the DVLA would appear to be relevant:-

    http://www.dvla.gov.uk/drivers/dmed1.htm#4
    http://www.dvla.gov.uk/drivers/dmed1_files/group1.htm

    I would think that if she had an accident as a result of this that the police/dvla/insurance company would be all over her, and quite rightly in my opinion.

    Jonathan
     
  9. tickle me elmo

    Gangster

    Joined: 11 Nov 2005

    Posts: 362

    Neurological Conditions
    F1 Fits or blackouts

    that says the dvla MUST BE INFORMED!


    hope she uses her brain and waits untill her blackouts have cleared(a couple in the last 12m isnt acceptable) before driving(the doctor will decide if she is ok), else risk running over loads of people and children at a crossing which she would end up in jail for.
     
  10. benneh

    Sgarrista

    Joined: 9 Apr 2004

    Posts: 9,170

    Location: Nr. brumijum

    Indeedy she would be held fully accountable for not informing the DVLA (and for driving with the condition). Plus it's morally incongruous. Not to flame br0, but she shouldnt be driving a dodgem at a funfair, let alone a 2 tonne bullet.
    An ex mrs of mine was the same, something to do with iron in her blood. She did the right thing. She informed the DVLA and layed off the driving (for around 12 months IIRC). Story had a happy ending.. She didn't kill any babies :p .
     
  11. Meridian

    Man of Honour

    Joined: 18 Oct 2002

    Posts: 11,998

    Location: Vvardenfell



    A colleague had a single black-out at work a couple of years ago. Her licence was suspended and she was unable to drive until she had been free of blackouts for twelve months. In fact, she never had another one and has now been driving again for over a year.

    The DVLA (and police) take blackouts very seriously I'm afraid - for what I hope are obvious reasons. She will have to tell the DVLA, because if she ever has an accident and the blackout becomes know then she could struggle to prove that another blackout hadn't caused the accident. Oh, and it would be illegal NOT to tell the DVLA.


    M
     
  12. Conanius

    Capodecina

    Joined: 18 Oct 2002

    Posts: 12,488

    sounds right to me. Insurance companies and the police take people who crash as a result of blackouts VERY seriously, moreso if they have been advised not to drive (this WILL be on her medical record)

    ensure she calls the DVLA and her insurance company on Monday.
     
  13. Scania

    Capodecina

    Joined: 25 Nov 2004

    Posts: 24,571

    Location: On the road....

    Depends on what could happen if you continue to drive.

    For example, if somebody has a dodgy knee and changing gear etc would be a bad reason to drive due to it making your knee condition worse, fair enough, your only hurting yourself.

    If the medical reason is due to you being a risk to other road users, then its quite simple, don't drive.
     
  14. DannyDan

    Mobster

    Joined: 6 Jun 2005

    Posts: 2,669

    Location: Wirral, UK

    If she gets plenty of warning I don't see there being a problem; that would be like saying I can't drive because I'm diabetic. In days gone by this would be the case, but not any more.

    But DVLA should definitely be informed.
     
  15. sja360

    Mobster

    Joined: 28 Jul 2003

    Posts: 3,931

    Location: Dundee

    had iritis in the left eye to which the doctor recommended to not drive for a few days until it cleared up, if i remember correctly i think i drove anyhow as it was only one eye, also it got better relatively quick.
    i guess it depends on the problem though and the problems it could cause.