1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

G.Skill TridentZ 4600mhz volting

Discussion in 'Memory' started by Erik Gravrok, 31 Oct 2018.

  1. Erik Gravrok

    Associate

    Joined: 31 Oct 2018

    Posts: 7

    Hello, first post here, just gona jump straight in and ask.

    I bought some new parts for my gaming-rig

    - G.Skill Trident Z 4600mhz - https://www.overclockers.co.uk/g.sk...annel-kit-f4-4600c19d-16gtzkkc-my-10t-gs.html

    - Asus MAXIMUS XI Gene - https://www.overclockers.co.uk/asus...151-ddr4-micro-atx-motherboard-mb-6cr-as.html

    - I7 8086K - https://www.overclockers.co.uk/inte...e-socket-lga1151-processor-oem-cp-65c-in.html



    First things first. I am extremly green to touching anything BIOS-related, so you have to dumb it down for me.

    Case: My ram is default 2166 mhz in BIOS if I don't do anything. I went into BIOS after watching alot of youtube-videos about how to set ramspeed etc, tried to do it manually, but I ended up using XMP1-option instead, which gives me all the right CAS-timings etc and the volting of 1.5 (1.35 on box), now here is the twist. My PC won't boot with this XMP-mode on with 1.5 volts. So I fiddled around and I had to give it 1.65 volts for be able to boot.

    After being able to play and use my pc, I tuned the volt down to 1.5 just for fun and then it actually booted. But on the next reboot, it would't start - and I had to turn it all the way back up to 1.65 (Which is red in bios)

    Question: Is it dangerous with so much voltage and is there any way I can fix it?
     
  2. ATIorNvidia

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 10 Sep 2006

    Posts: 1,112

    Location: UK

    I'd be more worried about whatever voltage your Motherboard is giving to your cache/system agent on auto for such a high clock XMP profile. I would back off to 4000MHz or so, or even 3200-3600 with tight timings.

    1.65v on the RAM is on the very high side for 24/7 but I don't think it would kill the RAM if they are getting some decent airflow.
     
  3. Smffy

    Mobster

    Joined: 4 Dec 2015

    Posts: 3,152

    Location: London

    Not sure why the DRAM voltage is so high there, normally you switch the XMP profile and voltage is correct... Did you try manually changing to 1.35v and seeing if it boots? I’m using the 8Pack Dimms and XMP for their 4,133 works fine at the correct voltage (1.4).

    I would do manual overclocks on the CPU first also, should be able to get it 5+ on all cores pretty easily - there are tons of guides for ASUs boards so follow one of the ROG guides for the 8700k (same chip)
     
  4. Robert896r1

    Wise Guy

    Joined: 28 Sep 2018

    Posts: 1,031

    As I'm currently going through similar experiences, my lesson learned is that XMP means little in high end frequency RAM and mother board compatibility.

    There seems to be general lack of testing of high end RAM with various motherboards. The best you can hope for is to find the ram you want and email the company who makes it and ask for a compatibility list.

    Getting support post purchase means little, if anything.
     
  5. Erik Gravrok

    Associate

    Joined: 31 Oct 2018

    Posts: 7

    I am stable when I take the speed down to 4500mhz and 1.55 voltage, but not sure how/if i can take the volt any lower and still be stable.

    Is 1.55 volts too much?
     
  6. Nickolp1974

    Soldato

    Joined: 15 May 2012

    Posts: 5,392

    Location: Louth, lincs

    The voltages that you need to adjust is SA and vccio, getting these right is crucial for higher speeds.
    For 24/7 1.55v will be fine, I've tested upto 2.05v(for benchmarking only) on dram with no issues.
     
  7. Erik Gravrok

    Associate

    Joined: 31 Oct 2018

    Posts: 7

    Ah OK! Do you have any guidelines or links that explains how I can do this??
     
  8. Nickolp1974

    Soldato

    Joined: 15 May 2012

    Posts: 5,392

    Location: Louth, lincs

    For my sticks at 4133mhz C12 with tight sub timings I need 1.4v vccio and 1.3625v SA.

    What I would do for high speeds 4k+ start at 1.25v on both and then take each one up 0.05v at a time but do vccio 1st so for example

    1.3v io, 1.25v sa
    1.3v io, 1.3v sa
    1.35v up, 1.3v as etc

    Once you get in Windows test with a mem stability program, xtu men stress test or prime, once stable try and work voltages down a little but in smaller increments.
     
  9. Erik Gravrok

    Associate

    Joined: 31 Oct 2018

    Posts: 7

    Will deffo try this out when I got the time for it, since it seems very timeconsuming! Thnx alot
     
  10. Nickolp1974

    Soldato

    Joined: 15 May 2012

    Posts: 5,392

    Location: Louth, lincs

    All memory tweaking is very time consuming. Getting a high speed kit is not always a good thing because if your board or imc can't handle the speed then your going to have to set timings yourself instead of just using XMP. Now you have one of the best boards for mems tweaking so assumining the imc is ok on your cpu it should be just a case of tuning SA/IO volts, not 100% on 24/7 max volts for these but I wouldn't go past 1.4v. Maybe just for testing upto 1.45v
     
  11. Erik Gravrok

    Associate

    Joined: 31 Oct 2018

    Posts: 7

    It did crash and reboot the other day, and then it had changed the voltages you speak of, both, to around 1,3ish and it was in the red in bios. Does that matter?
     
  12. Nickolp1974

    Soldato

    Joined: 15 May 2012

    Posts: 5,392

    Location: Louth, lincs

    They will probably need to be in the red to run anything above 4000mhz
     
  13. Erik Gravrok

    Associate

    Joined: 31 Oct 2018

    Posts: 7

    Ah ok, and that is not damaging? Hence the red
     
  14. Silent_Scone

    Capodecina

    Joined: 5 Sep 2011

    Posts: 12,562

    Location: Surrey

    You should try to keep VCCSA to below 1.4v. 4600MHz is going to be tough to get unconditionally stable, so you need to evaluate what you want those speeds for.

    Be sure to try Maximus Tweak Modes 1 and 2, both offer advantages depending on IMC variance, with Mode 2 offering more relaxed memory sub sets.

    Use RAM Test to evaluate memory stability. https://www.karhusoftware.com/ramtest/